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Literature Emphasis AA

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The Associate of Arts with a literature emphasis is meant to introduce students to the formal study of literature and prepare them for a potential four-year degree in English. Students will be exposed to a broad knowledge of literary periods, genres, criticism, and methods of interpretation. Focus on intellectual and practical skills building will provide students with the ability to evaluate and critique a wide range of literary sources.

 

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2017 - 2018

  • Curriculum

    Program Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:Introduction to Literature      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of literatures and to means to credibly examine that literature. It thus includes literary terms, critical approaches and their application to literature.
    Introduction to LiteratureView06 3
    Survey of British Literature
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2550
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from its beginnings to 1785. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and Swift, among others, are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended.
    Survey of British Literature I orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2560
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature II      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from 1785 through the 20th century. The literature of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended
    Survey of British Literature IIView06,08 3
    Survey of American Literature
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2450
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary developments (e.g. sentimentalism, gothic fiction, romanticism, transcendentalism) and key historical and social contexts, from the pre-colonial period to 1860. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature I orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2460
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature II      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary movements (e.g. local color, realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism) and social and historical contexts, from 1860 to the present. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature IIView06,07 3
     
    Program Electives
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    16 credits of Literature Electives
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1400
    Course Title:Reading Poetry or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of poetry: the reading and analysis of poetic works from a variety of time periods and cultures. Important figures, poetic traditions and movements, formal techniques, and other methods of evoking mood and meaning will be explored through discussion and in both written and oral projects throughout the semester.
    Reading Poetry orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1450
    Course Title:Reading Plays or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a survey of drama as literature; plays will be read as literary texts, not as the grounds for specific performances or performance practices. Through their engagements with the dramatic literature in this course, students will be introduced to a diversity of dramatic styles and themes. Attention will also be devoted to the social and cultural contexts in which the plays were written and in which they are read. Course materials may be organized either historically or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Reading Plays orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1950
    Course Title:Graphic Novels or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to the diverse body of literature known as "graphic novels." While emphasis will be placed on works that are specifically considered graphic novels, it may also include the study of other comics-strips and books-that have significantly contributed to the development of the form. Students can expect to be exposed not only to a wide range of graphic novel types, such as autobiography, journalism, history, humor, dramatic fiction, manga, and superheroes, but also to a deeper understanding of the methods of telling stories that are unique to comics.
    Graphic Novels orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1990
    Course Title:Topics: or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:This course will provide flexibility in offering an in-depth review of topics of immediate importance and topical interest. These topics will go beyond the introductory courses in examining specific aspects of the subject matter.
    Topics: orViewn/a1
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2270
    Course Title:Modern American Literature or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to selected American writers of the twentieth and/or twenty-first centuries and their works. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or 1201
    Modern American Literature orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Children's Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:In this course, students will have the pleasure of reading, discussing and evaluating childrens literature ranging from the picture book to the young adult novel. Students will explore the history of childrens literature, critical responses to it and its specific role for children and adults. Students will examine works from the genre that might include picture books, chapter books, folktales, fantasy, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry and nonfiction with an emphasis on how the genre and its themes have evolved over time, paying particular attention to how those themes address the role of children in society. This course will appeal to students, parents and educators. Prerequisite: Assessment score placement in Adev 0951 or above, ENGL 0950 or above, or ESOL 1230 or above. Recommendation: Completion of ENGL 1201 with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Children's Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2310
    Course Title:American Short Story or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:The short story is a form that was created and refined by American writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will study American short story writers, their stories, and their views of American life.
    American Short Story orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2330
    Course Title:Hmong American Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Hmong American Literature explores the works of Hmong writers as represented in the novel, nonfiction, short stories, poetry, drama/film, and Paj Ntaub (stories recorded in tapestry). To a more limited extent, characterizations of Hmong in works by non-Hmong authors may be considered, as well as relevant works by Laotian American and Asian American writers.
    Hmong American Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2340
    Course Title:Nature in Literature or      Goal Areas:06,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course surveys literature that examines the relation between human beings and the natural world as that relationship has been variously conceived by British, American, and other writers. The literary works studied may begin with the pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance and focus on literature from the late eighteenth-century, nineteenth century, and contemporary works. The primary consideration of this course is on how a literary idea of nature has been affected and effected by variations in culture, namely, changes in politics, economics, and technology that in diverse cultural and historical contexts have created conflicts between ecological and human interests. Ultimately this study leads to considering how the "green language" created by the writers under study has contributed to an eco-critical ethic that allows examination of current ecological sensibilities and the language that represents them. The course may also engage oriental literature, for many American and British authors have aligned their thinking on nature with eastern religions. Additionally, the content will reference painters, philosophers, and composers whose works contribute a relevant understanding of nature-as they may lead into relevant scientific considerations of nature. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Nature in Literature orView06,10 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Women and Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course explores women as characters in and writers of literature, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. The course may also address issues of historical context, gender, class and race as a way of understanding women in literature.
    Women and Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2360
    Course Title:Global Literary Perspectives or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will interpret world literature and film (either in translation or originally written in English) that present culturally diverse voices and viewpoints. Special attention will be given to colonial and postcolonial literatures that reflect the immigrant communities of Twin Cities college campuses, such as Egyptian, Finnish, Ethiopian, Hmong, Icelandic, Iranian, Korean, Liberian, Mexican, Norwegian, Russian, Somali, Swedish, and Vietnamese. Prerequisite: Placement into Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Global Literary Perspectives orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2370
    Course Title:African American Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the student to the writings of African-Americans from the colonial period to the present and explores the contributions of these writers to American culture, letters, and life. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically.
    African American Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2380
    Course Title:American Indian Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the students to North American Native American Literature. Readings may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, songs, mythology, and film from traditional and contemporary authors. Special attention may be given to Native American authors with Minnesota connections, such as Louise Erdrich, David Treuer, and Susan Power.
    American Indian Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2390
    Course Title:American Working-Class Literature or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description: This course, providing much needed exposure to a largely overlooked body of writings, introduces students to a variety of classical and contemporary working-class texts that demonstrate literatures rich engagement with industrial, agricultural, domestic, and/or other labor in the United States. Encompassing writings by and about laborers and persons associated with labor, working-class literature reveals the often hidden ways that the material conditions and cultural expectations tied to class and work influence the shape of daily life and its literary expressions. Featuring textual, visual, and/or audio cultural productions, the course is designed to examine the problems and questions raised by working-class texts, which may include the changing nature of work, the dynamic experience of class, the historical circumstances that structure class, the intersection of literature and labor movements, the unstable definitions of literature, and the political dimensions of literature. The course may be organized historically or topically.
    American Working-Class Literature orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2400
    Course Title:Utopian/Dystopian Literature or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces students to the literature of utopias and dystopias, literary works about imaginary places, whose intention is to explore alternative models of political, cultural, and societal structures. Utopian/dystopian literatures seek to challenge existing ideas about governments, social communities, and constructions of human identity, but they also offer new, sometimes radical and transformative ideas regarding the reformation of existing human societies.
    Utopian/Dystopian Literature orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2450
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary developments (e.g. sentimentalism, gothic fiction, romanticism, transcendentalism) and key historical and social contexts, from the pre-colonial period to 1860. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature I orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2460
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature II or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary movements (e.g. local color, realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism) and social and historical contexts, from 1860 to the present. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature II orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2550
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from its beginnings to 1785. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and Swift, among others, are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended.
    Survey of British Literature I orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2560
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature II or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from 1785 through the 20th century. The literature of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended
    Survey of British Literature II orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2580
    Course Title:Shakespeare's Plays or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:A study of the major plays of William Shakespeare that may include a close reading of the plays, consideration of acting methods, and evaluation of cinematic and theatrical presentations. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Shakespeare's Plays orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2900
    Course Title:Fantasy Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to fantasy as a literary genre. It will expose students to various types of fantasy stories (such as high fantasy, sword and sorcery, urban fantasy, and/or fantasy horror). It will also address how fantasy literature can reflect or comment on issues in the real world, including how various forms of bigotry can be challenged or normalized by fantasy texts.
    Fantasy Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2950
    Course Title:Mystery and Detective Fiction      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to mystery and detective fiction as a literary genre and as popular literature, examining the conventions of suspense writing, possibly including hook, twist, red herring, back story, sub-plot, procedural, clues, and the ethical concerns of investigative methods and civic life. Discussion of various sub-genre styles will engage students in critical thinking applied to historical era, culturally diverse contexts, and gender roles in mystery writing.
    Mystery and Detective FictionView06,09 3
     
    General Education Courses
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1202
    Course Title:College Writing II      Goal Areas:01       Credits:2

    Course Description:This class focuses on the research process, textual analysis of primary and secondary sources, rhetorical strategies for argument and persuasion, and successful integration of sources into a longer academic paper utilizing MLA (or other, as appropriate) documentation format. The class may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or topical in content, as noted on the class registration site. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or 1201 with a grade of C or higher
    College Writing IIView01 2
    College Writing I
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Gateway College Writing or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    Gateway College Writing orView01 4
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1201
    Course Title:College Writing I      Goal Areas:01       Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    College Writing IView01 4
    Communications, choose one course
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Public Speaking or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides instruction and practical experience in the basics of public speaking. This course has a performance component: students are expected to create and deliver informative, persuasive and other types of speeches.
    Fundamentals of Public Speaking orView01 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Principles of Interpersonal Communication or      Goal Areas:01,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course looks at communication in one-to-one relationships in friendships, families, the workplace, and elsewhere. Students will be challenged to discover and assess their own communication strengths and weaknesses as they define and discuss what it means to be a competent interpersonal communicator. Course content includes both theory and practice (skill development).
    Principles of Interpersonal Communication orView01,07 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Small Group Communication      Goal Areas:01       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines communication in small groups. Students will participate in and analyze how small groups function, how leadership roles evolve, how decisions are made and how conflicts can be resolved. Students will work in small groups, complete group projects, and analyze group interaction.
    Small Group CommunicationView01 3
     
    MNTC Electives
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Natural Science - 2 courses, 7 credits from 2 different disciplines, one must be a lab course: ANTH1020(3), BIOL1000(4), BIOL1001(4), BIOL1002(4), BIOL1030(4), BIOL1101(4), BIOL1102(4), BIOL1120(3), BIOL1130(4), BIOL1140(4), BIOL1160(4), BIOL1200(4), BIOL1350(3), BIOL1360(4), BIOL1610(1), BIOL1650(1), BIOL2020(4), BIOL2030(4), BIOL2100(4), BIOL2111(4), BIOL2112(4), BIOL2360(4), CHEM1000(4), CHEM1010(4), CHEM1030(4), CHEM1061(4), CHEM1062(4), GEOG1010(3), GEOL1010(2), GEOL1020(2), GEOL1030(2), GEOL1040(2), GEOL1110(4), GEOL1120(4), GEOL1130(4), GEOL1150(4), GEOL1160(4), GEOL1850(3), GEOL1851(1), NSCI1000(4), NSCI1010(1), NSCI1020(1), NSCI1030(1), NSCI1050(4), NSCI1060(3), NSCI1061(1), NSCI1070(3), NSCI1071(1), NSCI1110(4), NSCI1120(4), PHYS1000(4), PHYS1030(4), PHYS1050(4), PHYS1060(3), PHYS1061(1), PHYS1070(3), PHYS1071(1), PHYS1120(4), PHYS1140(3), PHYS1201(5), PHYS1202(5), PHYS1400(3), PHYS1410(1), PHYS1450(3), PHYS1460(1), PHYS1601(5), PHYS1602(5)
    Mathematical/Logical Reasoning - 1 course, at least 3 credits: MATH1010(3), MATH1031(3), MATH1032(3), MATH1080(3), MATH1090(4), MATH1130(3), MATH1140(3), MATH1150(3), MATH1160(4), MATH1170(4), MATH1180(5), MATH1190(5), MATH1200(3), MATH1221(5), MATH1222(5), MATH2010(3), MATH2220(5), MATH2300(3), MATH2400(3), PHIL1050(3)
    History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences - 3 courses, 9 credits: ANTH1010(3), ANTH1130(3), ANTH1140(3), ECON1050(3), ECON1060(3), ECON1070(3), HIST1010(3), HIST1020(3), HIST1030(3), HIST1110(3), HIST1120(3), HIST1130(3), HIST1140(3), HIST1200(3), HIST1210(3), HIST1220(3), HIST1240(3), HIST1270(3), HIST1700(3), HIST1800(3), HIST1900(1), HIST2500(3), HIST2600(3), HIST2700(3), POLS1100(3), POLS1140(3), POLS1600(3), POLS1700(3), POLS2130(3), PSYC1110(3), PSYC1150(3), PSYC1160(4), PSYC1165(3), PSYC1170(3), PSYC1210(3), PSYC1220(3), PSYC1250(4), PSYC2110(3), PSYC2320(3), PSYC2330(3), PSYC2340(3), PSYC2350(3), SOC1110(3), SOC1710(3), SOC1750(3), SOC2110(3), SOC2200(3), SOC2210(3), SOC2410(3), SOC2730(3)
    Humanities and Fine Arts - 1 credit in a discipline other than English: AMST1010(3), AMST1020(3), AMST2210(3), AMST2220(3), ARBC1030(3), ART1040(3), ART1101(3), ART1102(3), ART1160(3), ART1170(3), ART1270(3), ART1301(3), ART1302(3), ART1310(3), ART1320(3), ART1340(3), ART1341(3), ART1361(3), ART1362(3), ART1401(3), ART1402(3), ART1770(3), ART1810(1), ART1820(2), ART2180(3), ART2190(3), ART2300(2), ART2611(3), ART2612(3), ART2640(3), ART2740(1), ART2750(1), ART2780(1), ART2781(1), ART2782(1), ART2800(1), ART2820(1), ART2860(1), ART2900(1), ART2970(1), GCST1030(3), GERM1030(3), INTD1030(3), MUSC1130(1), MUSC1160(1), MUSC1170(1), MUSC1180(1), MUSC1200(3), MUSC1220(3), MUSC1241(3), MUSC1242(3), MUSC1300(3), MUSC1320(1), MUSC1350(3), MUSC1500(2), MUSC1501(2), MUSC1502(2), MUSC1510(1), MUSC1560(1), MUSC1600(2), MUSC1610(1), MUSC1800(2), MUSC1801(2), MUSC1802(2), MUSC1810(1), MUSC1830(1), MUSC1850(1), MUSC1860(1), MUSC1870(1), MUSC2010(2), MUSC2170(3), MUSC2180(3), MUSC2241(3), MUSC2242(3), MUSC2970(1), PHIL1010(3), PHIL1020(3), PHIL1030(3), PHIL1040(3), PHIL1060(3), PHIL1220(3), SPAN1030(3), SPAN2201(5), SPAN2202(5), TFT1200(3), TFT1210(3), TFT1250(3), TFT1260(3), TFT1270(3), TFT1280(3), TFT1290(3), TFT1310(3), TFT1320(3), TFT1350(3), TFT1500(3), TFT1510(3), TFT1520(3), TFT1531(3), TFT1532(3), TFT1540(3), TFT1600(1), TFT1610(1), TFT2010(3), TFT2500(3), TFT2950(1)
    Highly recommended courses: ART 2970, MUSC 2970, TFT 2950
    Ethical and Civic Responsibility - 1 course: COMM1610(3), COMM1810(3), ECON1050(3), ENGL2390(3), ENGL2950(3), GCST1210(3), GCST1211(3), GCST1212(3), GCST1213(3), GCST1220(2), GCST1320(3), HIST1700(3), HIST2600(3), HIST2700(3), INTD1210(3), INTD1211(3), INTD1212(3), PHIL1020(3), PHIL1070(3), PHIL1110(3), PHIL1200(3), PHIL1210(3), PHIL1220(3), POLS1100(3), POLS1140(3), SOC1130(3)
    People and the Environment - 1 course: ANTH1020(3), ANTH1130(3), BIOL1030(4), BIOL1160(4), BIOL1200(4), BIOL1600(1), BIOL1610(1), CHEM1000(4), CHEM1010(4), ENGL2340(3), GCST1030(3), GCST1040(3), GEOG1010(3), GEOG1190(3), GEOL1010(2), GEOL1020(2), GEOL1030(2), GEOL1040(2), GEOL1120(4), GEOL1150(4), GEOL1160(4), GEOL1850(3), GEOL1851(1), INTD1030(3), INTD1040(3), NSCI1110(4), PHIL1200(3)
    Additional Electives, if needed, to reach 40 total MnTC credits: AMST1010(3), AMST1020(3), AMST2210(3), AMST2220(3), ANTH1010(3), ANTH1020(3), ANTH1130(3), ANTH1140(3), ARBC1030(3), ARBC1101(4), ARBC1102(4), ARBC2201(4), ART1040(3), ART1101(3), ART1102(3), ART1160(3), ART1170(3), ART1270(3), ART1301(3), ART1302(3), ART1310(3), ART1320(3), ART1340(3), ART1341(3), ART1361(3), ART1362(3), ART1401(3), ART1402(3), ART1770(3), ART1810(1), ART1820(2), ART2180(3), ART2190(3), ART2300(2), ART2611(3), ART2612(3), ART2640(3), ART2740(1), ART2750(1), ART2780(1), ART2781(1), ART2782(1), ART2800(1), ART2820(1), ART2860(1), ART2900(1), ART2970(1), ASL1101(4), ASL1102(4), ASL1300(3), ASL2201(4), ASL2202(4), BIOL1000(4), BIOL1001(4), BIOL1002(4), BIOL1030(4), BIOL1101(4), BIOL1102(4), BIOL1120(3), BIOL1130(4), BIOL1140(4), BIOL1160(4), BIOL1200(4), BIOL1350(3), BIOL1360(4), BIOL1600(1), BIOL1610(1), BIOL1650(1), BIOL2020(4), BIOL2030(4), BIOL2100(4), BIOL2111(4), BIOL2112(4), BIOL2360(4), CHEM1000(4), CHEM1010(4), CHEM1030(4), CHEM1061(4), CHEM1062(4), COMM1010(3), COMM1110(3), COMM1210(3), COMM1310(3), COMM1410(3), COMM1510(3), COMM1610(3), COMM1710(3), COMM1810(3), COMM1910(3), ECON1050(3), ECON1060(3), ECON1070(3), ENGL1111(3), ENGL1112(3), ENGL1150(3), ENGL1200(4), ENGL1201(4), ENGL1202(2), ENGL1250(2), ENGL1400(3), ENGL1450(3), ENGL1900(3), ENGL1950(3), ENGL2010(3), ENGL2020(3), ENGL2030(3), ENGL2270(3), ENGL2300(3), ENGL2310(3), ENGL2320(3), ENGL2330(3), ENGL2340(3), ENGL2350(3), ENGL2360(3), ENGL2370(3), ENGL2380(3), ENGL2390(3), ENGL2450(3), ENGL2460(3), ENGL2550(3), ENGL2560(3), ENGL2580(3), ENGL2590(3), ENGL2900(3), ENGL2950(3), GCST1030(3), GCST1040(3), GCST1210(3), GCST1211(3), GCST1212(3), GCST1213(3), GCST1220(2), GCST1320(3), GEOG1000(2), GEOG1010(3), GEOG1040(3), GEOG1100(3), GEOG1190(3), GEOL1010(2), GEOL1020(2), GEOL1030(2), GEOL1040(2), GEOL1110(4), GEOL1120(4), GEOL1130(4), GEOL1150(4), GEOL1160(4), GEOL1850(3), GEOL1851(1), GERM1030(3), HIST1010(3), HIST1020(3), HIST1030(3), HIST1110(3), HIST1120(3), HIST1130(3), HIST1140(3), HIST1200(3), HIST1210(3), HIST1220(3), HIST1240(3), HIST1270(3), HIST1700(3), HIST1800(3), HIST1900(1), HIST2500(3), HIST2600(3), HIST2700(3), HUM1210(3), INTD1030(3), INTD1040(3), INTD1210(3), INTD1211(3), INTD1212(3), MATH1010(3), MATH1031(3), MATH1032(3), MATH1080(3), MATH1090(4), MATH1130(3), MATH1140(3), MATH1150(3), MATH1160(4), MATH1170(4), MATH1180(5), MATH1190(5), MATH1200(3), MATH1221(5), MATH1222(5), MATH2010(3), MATH2220(5), MATH2300(3), MATH2400(3), MUSC1130(1), MUSC1160(1), MUSC1170(1), MUSC1180(1), MUSC1200(3), MUSC1220(3), MUSC1241(3), MUSC1242(3), MUSC1300(3), MUSC1320(1), MUSC1350(3), MUSC1500(2), MUSC1501(2), MUSC1502(2), MUSC1510(1), MUSC1560(1), MUSC1600(2), MUSC1610(1), MUSC1800(2), MUSC1801(2), MUSC1802(2), MUSC1810(1), MUSC1830(1), MUSC1850(1), MUSC1860(1), MUSC1870(1), MUSC2010(2), MUSC2170(3), MUSC2180(3), MUSC2241(3), MUSC2242(3), MUSC2970(1), NSCI1000(4), NSCI1010(1), NSCI1020(1), NSCI1030(1), NSCI1050(4), NSCI1060(3), NSCI1061(1), NSCI1070(3), NSCI1071(1), NSCI1110(4), NSCI1120(4), PHIL1010(3), PHIL1020(3), PHIL1030(3), PHIL1040(3), PHIL1050(3), PHIL1060(3), PHIL1070(3), PHIL1110(3), PHIL1200(3), PHIL1210(3), PHIL1220(3), PHYS1000(4), PHYS1030(4), PHYS1050(4), PHYS1060(3), PHYS1061(1), PHYS1070(3), PHYS1071(1), PHYS1120(4), PHYS1140(3), PHYS1201(5), PHYS1202(5), PHYS1400(3), PHYS1410(1), PHYS1450(3), PHYS1460(1), PHYS1601(5), PHYS1602(5), POLS1100(3), POLS1140(3), POLS1600(3), POLS1700(3), POLS2130(3), PSYC1110(3), PSYC1150(3), PSYC1160(4), PSYC1165(3), PSYC1170(3), PSYC1210(3), PSYC1220(3), PSYC1250(4), PSYC2110(3), PSYC2320(3), PSYC2330(3), PSYC2340(3), PSYC2350(3), SOC1110(3), SOC1130(3), SOC1710(3), SOC1750(3), SOC2110(3), SOC2200(3), SOC2210(3), SOC2410(3), SOC2730(3), SPAN1030(3), SPAN1101(5), SPAN1102(5), SPAN2201(5), SPAN2202(5), TFT1200(3), TFT1210(3), TFT1250(3), TFT1260(3), TFT1270(3), TFT1280(3), TFT1310(3), TFT1320(3), TFT1350(3), TFT1500(3), TFT1510(3), TFT1520(3), TFT1531(3), TFT1532(3), TFT1540(3), TFT1600(1), TFT1610(1), TFT1710(3), TFT2010(3), TFT2500(3), TFT2950(1), WOST0101(4), WOST0999(3), WOST1110(3)
     
    Health Requirement
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Health and Exercise Science - 2 courses, 4 credits, one Health course and one Exercise Science course: EXSC1010(2), EXSC1020(1), EXSC1041(1), EXSC1042(1), EXSC1050(1), EXSC1060(2), EXSC1070(1), EXSC1110(1), EXSC1130(1), EXSC1140(1), EXSC1151(1), EXSC1152(1), EXSC1200(1), EXSC1210(1), EXSC1230(1), EXSC1240(1), EXSC1250(3), EXSC1260(1), EXSC1270(1), EXSC1310(1), EXSC1400(1), EXSC1420(1), EXSC1430(1), EXSC1440(1), EXSC1451(1), EXSC1452(1), EXSC1500(3), EXSC1510(2), EXSC1520(3), EXSC1600(1), EXSC1610(1), EXSC1630(1), EXSC1640(1), EXSC1700(3), EXSC1710(3), EXSC1720(2), EXSC1730(1), EXSC1740(1), EXSC1750(1), EXSC1751(1), EXSC1752(1), EXSC1760(1), EXSC1800(1), EXSC1810(1), EXSC1820(1), EXSC1830(1), EXSC1840(1), EXSC1850(1), EXSC1860(1), EXSC1990(1), EXSC2101(4), EXSC2102(2), EXSC2110(3), EXSC2390(3), EXSC2490(4), HLTH1030(3), HLTH1040(3), HLTH1050(3), HLTH1060(3), HLTH1070(3), HLTH1080(3), HLTH1100(3), HLTH1250(3), HLTH1600(3), HLTH1900(3), HLTH1990(1), HLTH2060(3)
     
    NHCC Residency and GPA
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    15 Credits must be earned at NHCC
     
                                   Total Credit Required60

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