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Associate in Arts (AA) / Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC)

The Associate of Arts (A.A.) is designed to constitute the first two years of a liberal arts bachelor degree program. An A.A. degree includes the entire 40 credit Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) as the general education requirement. Students may also choose to concentrate in a particular field of study in preparation for a planned major or professional emphasis at a four-year-college by following the pre-major requirements of the desired transfer institution.

 

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2017 - 2018

  • Curriculum

    Goal Area 1: Communication
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1202
    Course Title:College Writing II      Goal Areas:01       Credits:2

    Course Description:This class focuses on the research process, textual analysis of primary and secondary sources, rhetorical strategies for argument and persuasion, and successful integration of sources into a longer academic paper utilizing MLA (or other, as appropriate) documentation format. The class may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or topical in content, as noted on the class registration site. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or 1201 with a grade of C or higher
    College Writing IIView01 2
    College Writing I
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Gateway College Writing or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    Gateway College Writing orView01 4
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1201
    Course Title:College Writing I      Goal Areas:01       Credits:4

    Course Description:This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included.
    College Writing IView01 4
    Communication - 1 course, 3 credits
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Public Speaking or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides instruction and practical experience in the basics of public speaking. This course has a performance component: students are expected to create and deliver informative, persuasive and other types of speeches.
    Fundamentals of Public Speaking orView01 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Principles of Interpersonal Communication or      Goal Areas:01,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course looks at communication in one-to-one relationships in friendships, families, the workplace, and elsewhere. Students will be challenged to discover and assess their own communication strengths and weaknesses as they define and discuss what it means to be a competent interpersonal communicator. Course content includes both theory and practice (skill development).
    Principles of Interpersonal Communication orView01,07 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Small Group Communication or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines communication in small groups. Students will participate in and analyze how small groups function, how leadership roles evolve, how decisions are made and how conflicts can be resolved. Students will work in small groups, complete group projects, and analyze group interaction.
    Small Group Communication orView01 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1410
    Course Title:Human Communication Theory or      Goal Areas:01       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course examines a selection of theories of human communication. The emphasis of the course will be to provide students with the ability to understand theorizing in general and then to apply this understanding to particular theories. Students will be challenged to explore different types, contexts, and aspects of human communication as they relate to their own lives. Course content will include theory relating to the communicator, the message, the relationships, the media and the culture.
    Human Communication Theory orView01 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1510
    Course Title:Nonverbal Communication or      Goal Areas:01,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Nonverbal Communication is an essential component of all communication. This introductory course is intended to increase communication effectiveness in a variety of contexts, including interpersonal, intercultural, and workplace. Students will understand, assess, and practice their own nonverbal codes and cues as well as study others' nonverbal codes and cues.
    Nonverbal Communication orView01,08 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1610
    Course Title:Introduction to Mass Communication or      Goal Areas:01,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for understanding mass media; for recognizing messages, making deliberate choices about them, and evaluating the effects of these messages in both an individual and societal context. Students will examine the history, evolution, and societal impact of a wide variety of media, including print, film, and social media and will develop skills to make informed, ethical evaluations of the mediated messages they receive.
    Introduction to Mass Communication orView01,09 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1710
    Course Title:Oral Interpretation and Traditions or      Goal Areas:01,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Oral Interpretation and Traditions is an introductory course in the effective oral presentation of written material. Students will analyze and perform literature from a variety of sources that represent different cultures and ethnicities. Students will also make connections between the cultural implications of oral tradition and performance.
    Oral Interpretation and Traditions orView01,08 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1810
    Course Title:Introduction to Health Communication or      Goal Areas:01,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for understanding human communication in the health care industry. Students will discuss and apply various communication strategies in a variety of contexts, including patient care, between healthcare professionals, and with a larger public in the form of healthcare advocacy campaigns. The impact of cultural diversity and ethics in decision-making will be examined in the context of healthcare professions.
    Introduction to Health Communication orView01,09 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1910
    Course Title:Argumentation and Public Advocacy or      Goal Areas:01,02       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for creating persuasive messages to audiences in formal, oppositional settings. Students will discuss and apply various communication strategies to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence, gain experience in a more formal debate setting, and evaluate and craft arguments ethically and responsibly. These assignments will prepare students for debate in a range of contexts, from interpersonal and small group settings to larger discussions of public and social policy in American culture. Prerequisite: COMM 1010
    Argumentation and Public Advocacy orView01,02 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1710
    Course Title:Oral Interpretation and Traditions      Goal Areas:01,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Oral Interpretation and Traditions is an introductory course in the effective oral presentation of written material. Students will analyze and perform literature from a variety of sources that represent different cultures and ethnicities. Students will also make connections between the cultural implications of oral tradition and performance.
    Oral Interpretation and TraditionsView01,08 3
     
    Goal Area 2: Critical Thinking
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Completion of the MnTC fulfills Goal Area 2 Critical Thinking
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1910
    Course Title:Argumentation and Public Advocacy or      Goal Areas:01,02       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for creating persuasive messages to audiences in formal, oppositional settings. Students will discuss and apply various communication strategies to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence, gain experience in a more formal debate setting, and evaluate and craft arguments ethically and responsibly. These assignments will prepare students for debate in a range of contexts, from interpersonal and small group settings to larger discussions of public and social policy in American culture. Prerequisite: COMM 1010
    Argumentation and Public Advocacy orView01,02 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1090
    Course Title:Statway Statistics II or      Goal Areas:02,04       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Students in this course are required to have taken the preceding course, Math 0990 in the previous semester. Topics for both courses include concepts and methods of statistics with an emphasis on data analysis. Topics include methods for collecting data, graphical and numerical descriptive statistics, correlation, simple linear regression, basic concepts of probability, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, and chi-square tests.
    Statway Statistics II orView02,04 4
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Informal Reasoning for Problem Solving or      Goal Areas:02,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies methods of problem solving, utilizing principles that distinguish good reasoning from poor reasoning. Students will evaluate claims and arguments in natural language, applying the concepts of validity, truth, induction, deduction, and relevance. Students will develop clear thinking, and recognize, criticize and avoid common fallacies. Conceptual analysis will be applied to areas of practical reasoning, to human values, to develop science and media literacy, and to further student self-awareness.
    Informal Reasoning for Problem Solving orView02,09 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Health Care Ethics      Goal Areas:02,06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course looks at the underlying assumptions that affect beliefs, practices, and policies in contemporary health care. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of the ethical principles and theories related to health care. A wide variety of health care issues and the challenges they present will be studied. Critical thinking skills will be emphasized in determining the best course of action for making ethical decisions in the health care field.
    Health Care EthicsView02,06,09 3
     
    Goal Area 3: Natural Science
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Natural Science - 2 courses, 7 credits from 2 different disciplines, one must be a lab course
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Intro to Anthropology: Physical Anthropology, Archaeology & Prehistory or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies the relationship of prehistoric physical and cultural origins and development of humankind to the establishment of the first civilizations of the Old and New worlds. It examines the archaeological evidence for the theory of bio-cultural evolution, which helps to explain both the prehistoric developments and much of the cultural variation that is in the world today. The course does include a lab-like experience.
    Intro to Anthropology: Physical Anthropology, Archaeology & Prehistory orView03,10 3
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Life Science or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:The course introduces the breadth of biology from the principles of chemistry to ecology. The production and utilization of biological energy is explored at the cellular and organism level. The principles of inheritance and cellular reproduction are explored at the molecular, cellular level and organism levels. The unity and diversity of life and life processes is emphasized. The laboratory focuses on the techniques required to discover biological principles. Activities are hands-on. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab).
    Life Science orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1001
    Course Title:Biology I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course focuses on the concepts of biological chemistry, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, molecular genetics and heredity reproduction and development. The course is intended for allied health majors and others not requiring a majors-level introductory biology. High school algebra and chemistry are recommended. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab).
    Biology I orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1002
    Course Title:Biology II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Biology II orn/a4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Boundary Waters Canoe Area Field Biology or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is a lecture, lab, and field based course in which students will study the biological communities and ecology of the mixed coniferous/deciduous forests, lakes, and wetland ecosystems of the BWCA region. The course culminates with an eight to nine day long field trip to the area. This course is open to all students.
    Boundary Waters Canoe Area Field Biology orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1101
    Course Title:Principles of Biology I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is the first course in a two-semester biology sequence. This course introduces students to the concepts of cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, heredity and genetics. This course is intended for students for biological and physical science majors or those planning to enter a professional program. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: CHEM 1061 or Concurrent Registration with CHEM 1061
    Principles of Biology I orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1102
    Course Title:Principles of Biology II or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is the second in the two semester sequence of introductory biology. Topics include principles of evolution, ecology, biodiversity and an introduction to living systems. Utilization of preserved animal specimens is a required part of this course. One semester of college chemistry is recommended. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: BIOL 1101; or BIOL 1001 with instructor permission and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1061
    Principles of Biology II orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Human Biology or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory level course provides students with a one semester overview of the structure and function of the human body. The course is open to all students: however, it does not fulfill the human anatomy and physiology requirement for those who are planning to pursue a career in the health sciences. This course fulfills the lab-like experience requirements for MnTC Goal Area 3.
    Human Biology orView03 3
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Human Biology with a Lab or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This introductory level course provides students with a one semester overview of the structure and function of the human body. The course is open to all students: however, it does not fulfill the human anatomy and physiology requirement for those who are planning to pursue a career in the health sciences. This course has a laboratory experience and fulfills the requirements for MnTC Goal Area 3. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
    Human Biology with a Lab orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:Introduction to Human Genetics and Origins or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course in an introduction to human genetics and origins including evolution and ancestry. Students are introduced to cell biology, inheritance, epigenetics, DNA, chromosomes, mutations, population genetics, genetics of health and behavior, genomics and genetic technologies. Students will use the process of scientific inquiry to analyze personal genetic data from direct-to-consumer DNA testing in a guided independent project. Testing with a direct-to-consumer (DTC) testing company will be done at the start of the course, or students may opt-out and use available genomes. Students who have previously tested with a DTC company should consult with the instructor. This course is suitable for both biology majors and non-majors. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
    Introduction to Human Genetics and Origins orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Global Environment Field Biology or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to the ecology and environmental issues of various locations abroad, and present them within the context of the social, cultural and political conditions of that country or region. Students will examine how various cultures and societies approach ecological and environmental problems. The impact of globalization on these issues will be a major focus of the course. Students will travel to the country or region of study to examine first-hand the issues covered in the course.
    Global Environment Field Biology orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Current Environmental Issues or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course examines various aspects of natural and human-made ecosystems, human's intervention, and the subsequent impact on society and nature. It emphasizes current problems, values, and projection for the future. The lab involves internet exercises, videos, group discussion, individual and group projects, field trips and other outdoor activities. (3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
    Current Environmental Issues orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1350
    Course Title:Biology of Women or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed to allow students to explore the biological aspects of being female throughout her life cycle from sex cell formation through menopause and aging. Students will also gain an historical perspective of women over the ages including women in science, will be introduced to the nature of science and the scientific method, study the biology of gender differences, gain a multicultural perspective of women's health issues as well as a comprehensive study of female and male reproductive biology. Topics that will be covered include sex cell formation, genetic inheritance, gene expression, sex determination, pregnancy and birth as well as other health issues such pre-menstrual syndrome, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, and cancer. This course includes a lab-like experience. The course is open to both male and female students.
    Biology of Women orView03 3
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1360
    Course Title:Biology of Women with a Lab or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is designed to allow students to explore the biological aspects of being female throughout her life cycle from sex cell formation through menopause and aging. Students will also gain an historical perspective of women over the ages including women in science, will be introduced to the nature of science and the scientific method, study the biology of gender differences, gain a multicultural perspective of women's health issues as well as a comprehensive study of female and male reproductive biology. Topics that will be covered include sex cell formation, genetic inheritance, gene expression, sex determination, pregnancy and birth as well as other health issues such pre-menstrual syndrome, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, and cancer. The course is open to both male and female students. (3 hours lecture/2 hours lab) NOTE: This course has a lab component that incorporates active learning in a lab setting to support classroom material.
    Biology of Women with a Lab orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1610
    Course Title:Field Ecology or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is a team-taught, field-based introduction to the flora, fauna and biological communities of the woodland, lake, and wetland ecosystems of northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. This course is a field experience including observations, hypothesis, predictions, and evaluation of scientific data and results. A three-day trip to a university biological field station provides the venue for this hands-on course which is open to all students.
    Field Ecology orView03,10 1
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1650
    Course Title:Human Biology Series or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course provides students with an Intensive overview of sophisticated, timely topics in biology related to the human condition. This course is intended for general audiences. The overview will include development of scientific background for understanding the topic historical perspective, significance of the issue in both a societal and a scientific context, and exploration of the scientific processes related to the topic. These courses include a variety of topics of interest to any student. Topics have included: Bioethics, Biology of Alcoholism, Biology of HIV, Biology of Viruses, Emerging Diseases, and other current topics pertaining to human biology. This course fulfills the lab-like experience requirement for MnTC Goal area 3. Check web site for each semester's topics. This course is open to all students.
    Human Biology Series orView03 1
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2020
    Course Title:Animal Biology or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course provides a framework for understanding the phylogenetic relationships among the major groups (phyla) of animals. Knowledge of the ecology, morphology, and evolutionary history of the phyla informs the student's understanding of how diverse groups of animals have solved the common problems of existence (e.g., feeding, movement, respiration, and reproduction) and how their solutions have given rise to increasing levels of structural complexity. The laboratory is an integral part of the course; activities are hands-on and require dissection of preserved animals.(3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab) Pre-requisite: Biology 1001/1101 and Biology 1002/1102 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the professor.
    Animal Biology orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2030
    Course Title:Plant Biology or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to plant biology, and is intended for students majoring in biology and related fields. The course includes a survey of the major taxonomic groups of plants, fundamentals of plant anatomy, physiology, reproduction and development, evolution, and systematics. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: Biol 1001/1101 and Biol 1002/1102 with a grade of C or better, or consent of the professor.
    Plant Biology orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2100
    Course Title:Microbiology or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a study of bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa, infection, immunity, human diseases and microbiology of food and water. Laboratory exercises stress detection, isolation and control of microorganisms. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: Biol 1001 or 1101 with grade of "C" or better
    Microbiology orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2111
    Course Title:Human Anatomy and Physiology I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is the first course of a two-course sequence. The course offers students a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body in a classroom and laboratory setting. Topics include anatomical terminology, homeostasis, cell structure and function, histology, as well as the anatomy and physiology of the following organ systems; integumentary, skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, special senses and endocrine. Utilization of preserved specimens in the laboratory is a required part of the course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Strongly recommend college level reading abilities, a working knowledge of elementary algebra and a medical terminology course. Prerequisite: Biol 1001 or 1101 with grade of "C" or better. Recommendations for student success in this class include: a prior course in medical terminology, college level reading and basic algebra skills
    Human Anatomy and Physiology I orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2112
    Course Title:Human Anatomy and Physiology II or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is the second course of a two-course sequence. This course offers students a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body in a classroom and laboratory setting. Topics include the anatomy and physiology of the following organ systems: circulatory, non-specific and specific defenses, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and early development. Strongly recommend college level reading abilities, a working knowledge of elementary algebra and a medical terminology course. Utilization of preserved specimens in the laboratory is a required part of the course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Prerequisite: Biol 2111 with a grade of "C" or better.
    Human Anatomy and Physiology II orView03 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:2360
    Course Title:Genetics or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:We will examine the organization, storage, maintenance, transfer, and expression of genetic information. Molecular data and Mendelian principles will be applied to understand genetics at the molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. Skills of professional biologists will be practiced, such as reading primary literature, designing/carrying out experiments, and evaluating qualitative and quantitative data. Prerequisite: BIOL 1101 or BIOL 1001, and MATH 1150, with a C or better in each. Recommended: completion or coenrollment in BIOL 1102.
    Genetics orView03 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Chemistry and Society or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is a basic introduction to chemistry in the everyday world, with emphasis on the role that chemistry plays in personal and professional lives. It is intended for anyone seeking to become a better informed citizen of our technological society. Basic chemical principles will be introduced and their impact on society will be discussed. The course enables students to use concepts of chemistry to think critically about current issues in science and technology. No background in Chemistry or other Natural Sciences is presumed; a strong background in math is not required. Heavy use of the internet for research and communication will be an important component of this course. This course is recommended for non-science majors looking to fulfill the science course with lab component. (3 hours lecture / 3 hours lab)
    Chemistry and Society orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Introduction to Chemistry or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:An introduction to the basic concepts of Chemistry along with mathematical application, which include the atomic theory, periodic trends, stoichiometric relationships, kinetic-molecular theory, molecular structure, heat transfer, and chemical properties as related to the gas and liquid and solid phases. Additionally, this course will explore the role that chemistry plays in our personal and professional lives. This course enables students to think critically about current environmental issues in science. The lab portion contains experiments that includes observation, data collection and analysis, and mathematical applications that support the concepts being studied in class. The course is designed for non-science majors or students who have not completed chemistry in high school in order to prepare them to take Chem 1061 or courses in various health programs. Prerequisite: Math 0900 or Math 0980 with a grade of 'C' or better.
    Introduction to Chemistry orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Introduction to Physical Sciences or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:In this course, students will explore the basics of chemistry and physics by examining such concepts as understanding and measuring matter; atoms, elements, compounds and mixtures; physical and chemical properties of matter; states of matter; chemistry fundamentals, the periodic table; bonding and types of compounds; mixtures and solutions; chemical reactions; properties and sources of energy; heat; electricity, circuits, and power; properties of sound & light; the behavior of sound & light; forces and motion; work and simple machines. This course is intended for students who wish to complete a science course with a lab. It is not a prerequisite for any science or health programs. This course may not be used as a substitute for a chemistry course or a physics course. Math 0901 (Intro to Algebra) or basic math skills are highly recommended.
    Introduction to Physical Sciences orView03 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1061
    Course Title:Principles of Chemistry I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a study of the basic concepts of Chemistry, with an emphasis on atomic theory, stoichiometric relationships, kinetic-molecular theory, molecular structure, and chemical bonding as related to the gas and liquid and solid phases. The lab portion with experiments includes observation, data collection, and mathematical applications that support the concepts being studied in class. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Placement in this class will be determined by student college assessment score and/or successful completion of Math 1150 with a grade of C or better.
    Principles of Chemistry I orView03 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1062
    Course Title:Principles of Chemistry II or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:A continuation of CHEM 1061, this course emphasizes chemical equilibrium, solution chemistry, acid-base chemistry, precipitation reactions, complex ion formation, oxidation-reduction, and electrochemical reactions. The laboratory portion includes experimental applications of the lecture topics: determination of cation and anion (qualitative) content of unknown mixture, kinetics, acid-base equilibria, solubility, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and an introduction to nuclear chemistry. CHEM 1061 is required for this course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
    Principles of Chemistry II orView03 4
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Physical Geography or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide an introduction to the physical processes that are at work at all times on the surface of the earth. This course provides an introduction to the processes that influence the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Topics covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, blizzards, winds, precipitation, the Hydrological Cycle, vegetation and soil. This course includes a basic understanding of how these systems interact and how the physical landscape interacts with the human landscape. Included in this will be discussions about environmental concerns such as acid precipitation, ozone depletion, soil degradation, desertification and rainforest destruction. This course includes lab-like coursework/exams that will enhance a student's ability to make observations, form questions, pose hypotheses, make predictions and critically evaluate scientific data and results.
    Physical Geography orView03,10 3
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Glacial Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Glacial Geology orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Volcanic, Plutonic and Metamorphic Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Volcanic, Plutonic and Metamorphic Geology orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Fluvial Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Fluvial Geology orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Caves, Karst and Ancient Seaways or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Caves, Karst and Ancient Seaways orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Physical Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Physical Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Historical Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Historical Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Rocky Mountain Field Study or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Rocky Mountain Field Study orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:Boundary Waters Field Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Boundary Waters Field Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Global Environmental Field Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Global Environmental Field Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1850
    Course Title:Oceanography or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Oceanography orn/a3
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1851
    Course Title:Oceanography Lab or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Oceanography Lab orn/a1
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Conceptual Physics or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a combined lecture and laboratory course designed for people who want to learn about the fundamental laws and principles that form the basis of the working of the physical universe. This course helps the student understand and appreciate how and why a wide range of common and everyday physical phenomena occur. Topics include: laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, fluids, heat, vibration, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, and light. Some algebra is used in the presentation, so a mathematical preparation equivalent to Math 0902 is recommended. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
    Conceptual Physics orView03 4
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Science of Disaster Workshop I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:These courses examine the scientific mechanisms and basis of hazards that are of local, regional, national and global concern for public health, safety and environmental impact. Scientific background of distributions, risks, and case histories for each major hazard will be presented. Topics are divided as follows: 1010 Disasters related to the Lithosphere (rigid portion of earth's surface); 1020 Disasters related to the Hydrosphere (water) and Atmosphere (air); 1030 Disasters related to the Biosphere (realm where life exists), including those societally-induced. This course includes a lab-like experience. Take-home final exam and/or paper/projects required.
    Science of Disaster Workshop I orView03 1
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Science of Disaster Workshop II or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:These courses examine the scientific mechanisms and basis of hazards that are of local, regional, national and global concern for public health, safety and environmental impact. Scientific background of distributions, risks, and case histories for each major hazard will be presented. Topics are divided as follows: 1010 Disasters related to the Lithosphere (rigid portion of earth's surface); 1020 Disasters related to the Hydrosphere (water) and Atmosphere (air); 1030 Disasters related to the Biosphere (realm where life exists), including those societally-induced. This course includes a lab-like experience. Take-home final exam and/or paper/projects required.
    Science of Disaster Workshop II orView03 1
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Science of Disaster Workshop III or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:These courses examine the scientific mechanisms and basis of hazards that are of local, regional, national and global concern for public health, safety and environmental impact. Scientific background of distributions, risks, and case histories for each major hazard will be presented. Topics are divided as follows: 1010 Disasters related to the Lithosphere (rigid portion of earth's surface); 1020 Disasters related to the Hydrosphere (water) and Atmosphere (air); 1030 Disasters related to the Biosphere (realm where life exists), including those societally-induced. This course includes a lab-like experience. Take-home final exam and/or paper/projects required.
    Science of Disaster Workshop III orView03 1
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Astronomy or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course takes a "big picture" look at the universe as a whole. Topics include history of astronomy, origin and features of the planets and the Solar System, the lives and deaths of stars, cosmology and the fate of the universe. It also covers recent discoveries and current topics in astronomy. The laboratory component provides a variety of methods to more fully investigate the process of astronomy. The course meets requirements as a natural sciences lab course under Goal Area 3 of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum. (3 hours lecture/week, 2 hours lab/week)
    Astronomy orView03 4
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:The Solar System or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides an introduction to astronomy with emphasis on our Solar System. Topics include the origin, structure, and history of the Solar System; the properties of light; the function and use of telescopes, understanding the processes that have shaped the planets, their moons and ring systems; comets, asteroids and other space debris. Recent discoveries and current topics from the exploration of the Solar System are also discussed. This course includes a lab-like experience. (3 hours lecture; satisfies MnTC Goal Area 3)
    The Solar System orView03 3
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1061
    Course Title:Solar System Lab or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:An optional course laboratory course designed to complement The Solar System lecture class. It will involve investigation of the process of astronomy through the analysis of astronomical data. Computer simulation software, internet exercises, videos and observational sessions may be used within the course. (2 hrs/week) Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys/NSci 1060 AND Math 0902 or equivalent. If taking this course concurrently with PHYS 1060, you must obtain instructor permission and complete appropriate paperwork for pre-requisite override.
    Solar System Lab orView03 1
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Concepts of the Stars and Universe or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides an introduction to astronomy with an emphasis on stars and galaxies. Topics include understanding the Sun as a star; revealing the messages hidden in starlight; stellar birth, maturation, and death; black holes, white dwarfs, pulsars, quasars, and supernova explosions; the Milky Way and other galaxies; the origin and the fate of the universe. Current topics and discoveries from stellar astronomy and cosmology are also discussed. This course includes a lab-like experience. (3 hours lecture; meets MnTC Goal Area 3 requirements)
    Concepts of the Stars and Universe orView03 3
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1071
    Course Title:Stars and the Universe Lab or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:An optional course laboratory course designed to complement the Concepts of Stars and the Universe lecture class, It will involve investigation of the process of astronomy through the analysis of astronomical data. Computer simulation software, Internet exercises, videotapes and observational sessions may be used within the course. (2 hrs/week) Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys/NSci 1070 AND Math 0902 or equivalent. If taking this course concurrently with PHYS 1070, you must obtain instructor permission and complete appropriate paperwork for pre-requisite override.
    Stars and the Universe Lab orView03 1
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Minnesota's Natural History or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a team-taught, field-based introduction to the flora, fauna, ecology, and geologic development of Minnesota. A series of in-class sessions will prepare students for recognition and identification of plants, animals, habitats, and geologic features and for the integration of these biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. This course will include an examination of natural resource issues and policies in the context of Minnesota's politics and economy. Two weekend field trips are mandatory. These field trips will begin on Friday afternoon and end on Sunday afternoon or early evening. This course fulfills lab requirement for Goal Area 3. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
    Minnesota's Natural History orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Meteorology or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is designed for people who desire to learn about the weather. This course helps the student learn to observe and interpret the sky, to read weather maps, and to understand the sequence of meteorological phenomena. The topics to be covered include: air temperature, humidity, condensation, clouds, air pressure, wind, atmospheric circulation, weather forecasting, computer modeling, thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
    Meteorology orView03 4
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Conceptual Physics or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a combined lecture and laboratory course designed for people who want to learn about the fundamental laws and principles that form the basis of the working of the physical universe. This course helps the student understand and appreciate how and why a wide range of common and everyday physical phenomena occur. Topics include: laws of motion, work, energy, momentum, fluids, heat, vibration, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, and light. Some algebra is used in the presentation, so a mathematical preparation equivalent to Math 0902 is recommended. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
    Conceptual Physics orView03 4
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Introduction to Physical Sciences or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:In this course, students will explore the basics of chemistry and physics by examining such concepts as understanding and measuring matter; atoms, elements, compounds and mixtures; physical and chemical properties of matter; states of matter; chemistry fundamentals, the periodic table; bonding and types of compounds; mixtures and solutions; chemical reactions; properties and sources of energy; heat; electricity, circuits, and power; properties of sound & light; the behavior of sound & light; forces and motion; work and simple machines. This course is intended for students who wish to complete a science course with a lab. It is not a prerequisite for any science or health programs. This course may not be used as a substitute for a chemistry course or a physics course. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab) Math 0901 (Intro to Algebra) or basic math skills are highly recommended.
    Introduction to Physical Sciences orView03 4
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Astronomy or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course takes a "big picture" look at the universe as a whole. Topics include history of astronomy, origin and features of the planets and the Solar System, the lives and deaths of stars, cosmology and the fate of the universe. It also covers recent discoveries and current topics in astronomy. The laboratory component provides a variety of methods to more fully investigate the process of astronomy. The course meets requirements as a natural sciences lab course under Goal Area 3 of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum. (3 hours lecture/week, 2 hours lab/week)
    Astronomy orView03 4
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:The Solar System or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides an introduction to astronomy with emphasis on our Solar System. Topics include the origin, structure, and history of the Solar System; the properties of light; the function and use of telescopes, understanding the processes that have shaped the planets, their moons and ring systems; comets, asteroids and other space debris. Recent discoveries and current topics from the exploration of the Solar System are also discussed. This course includes a lab-like experience. (3 hours lecture; satisfies MnTC Goal Area 3)
    The Solar System orView03 3
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1061
    Course Title:Solar System Lab or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:An optional course laboratory course designed to complement The Solar System lecture class. It will involve investigation of the process of astronomy through the analysis of astronomical data. Computer simulation software, internet exercises, videos and observational sessions may be used within the course. (2 hrs/week) Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys/NSci 1060 AND Math 0902 or equivalent. If taking this course concurrently with PHYS 1060, you must obtain instructor permission and complete appropriate paperwork for pre-requisite override.
    Solar System Lab orView03 1
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Concepts of the Stars and Universe or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides an introduction to astronomy with an emphasis on stars and galaxies. Topics include understanding the Sun as a star; revealing the messages hidden in starlight; stellar birth, maturation, and death; black holes, white dwarfs, pulsars, quasars, and supernova explosions; the Milky Way and other galaxies; the origin and the fate of the universe. Current topics and discoveries from stellar astronomy and cosmology are also discussed. This course includes a lab-like experience. (3 hours lecture; meets MnTC Goal Area 3 requirements)
    Concepts of the Stars and Universe orView03 3
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1071
    Course Title:Stars and the Universe lab or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:1

    Course Description:An optional course laboratory course designed to complement the Concepts of Stars and the Universe lecture class, It will involve investigation of the process of astronomy through the analysis of astronomical data. Computer simulation software, Internet exercises, videotapes and observational sessions may be used within the course. (2 hrs/week) Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Phys/NSci 1070 AND Math 0902 or equivalent. If taking this course concurrently with PHYS 1070, you must obtain instructor permission and complete appropriate paperwork for pre-requisite override.
    Stars and the Universe lab orView03 1
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Meteorology or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is designed for people who desire to learn about the weather. This course helps the student learn to observe and interpret the sky, to read weather maps, and to understand the sequence of meteorological phenomena. The topics to be covered include: air temperature, humidity, condensation, clouds, air pressure, wind, atmospheric circulation, weather forecasting, computer modeling, thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes. (3 hours lecture, 2 hours lab)
    Meteorology orView03 4
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:Energy Aspects of Our Physical Environment or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed for people who desire to learn about the various sources of energy and the problems associated with its production and consumption on the local, state, national, and international levels. Topics to be covered include: energy principles, fossil fuels, electric energy, acid precipitation, energy conservation, infringements on the global atmosphere, the principles of sustainability, and the orderly translation from our current energy mix to a new mix utilizing nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal, and new emerging technologies. This course includes a lab-like experience. (3 hours lecture)
    Energy Aspects of Our Physical Environment orView03 3
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1201
    Course Title:Principles of Physics I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course is the first of an algebra-based two-semester introductory physics sequence.Topics to be covered include: motion in one and two dimensions, Newton's laws of motion, energy, momentum, rotational motion, static equilibrium, oscillations, gravitation, fluids. Concepts of right-triangle trigonometry will be introduced as needed. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours lab). Prerequisite: Successful completion of either MATH 1150 or MATH 1180 with a C or better OR eligibility for either MATH 1170 or MATH 1221 through College math placement score.
    Principles of Physics I orView03 5
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1202
    Course Title:Principles of Physics II or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course is the second of a two-semester introductory physics course for students with a mathematics preparation of algebra and some trigonometry. Topics to be covered include: wave motion, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and light. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours lab) Prerequisite: Physics 1201 or consent of instructor
    Principles of Physics II orView03 5
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1400
    Course Title:The Solar System or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The Solar System orn/a3
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1410
    Course Title:Solar System Lab or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Solar System Lab orn/a1
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1450
    Course Title:Concepts of the Stars and Universe or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Concepts of the Stars and Universe orn/a3
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1460
    Course Title:Concepts of the Stars and Universe Lab or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Concepts of the Stars and Universe Lab orn/a1
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1601
    Course Title:General Physics I or      Goal Areas:03       Credits:5

    Course Description:This is the first course of a two-semester introductory physics sequence for students with a mathematical preparation of one semester of calculus. The topics to be covered include: motion in one and two dimensions, Newton's laws of motion, energy, momentum, rotational motion, oscillations, gravitation, fluids and wave motion. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) Prerequisite: Math 1221
    General Physics I orView03 5
    Course Subject: PHYS         Course Number:1602
    Course Title:General Physics II      Goal Areas:03       Credits:5

    Course Description:This is the second course of a two-semester introductory physics sequence for students with a mathematical preparation of two semesters of calculus. The topics to be covered include: thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. (4 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory) Prerequisite: Phys 1601; Math 1222
    General Physics IIView03 5
    Lab Courses: BIOL1000(4), BIOL1001(4), BIOL1002(4), BIOL1101(4), BIOL1102(4), BIOL1130(4), BIOL1200(4), BIOL1360(4), BIOL2020(4), BIOL2030(4), BIOL2100(4), BIOL2111(4), BIOL2112(4), CHEM1000(4), CHEM1010(4), CHEM1030(4), CHEM1061(4), CHEM1062(4), GEOL1110(4), GEOL1120(4), GEOL1130(4), GEOL1851(1), NSCI1000(4), NSCI1050(4), NSCI1061(1), NSCI1071(1), NSCI1110(4), NSCI1120(4), PHYS1000(4), PHYS1030(4), PHYS1050(4), PHYS1061(1), PHYS1071(1), PHYS1120(4), PHYS1130(4), PHYS1201(5), PHYS1202(5), PHYS1410(1), PHYS1460(1), PHYS1601(5), PHYS1602(5)
     
    Goal Area 4: Mathematical/Logical Reasoning
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Mathematical/Logical Reasoning - 1 course, at least 3 credits
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Survey of Mathematics or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:Designed for the liberal arts student, this course explores the diversity of math and is focused on developing quantitative skill and reasoning ability. Topics are chosen by the instructor and may include but are not limited to: logic, problem solving, and data analysis, mathematics of social choice, geometry, financial mathematics, infinity, topology, and probability. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 0900 or 0902 or 0980 or 1031 or 1130 or 1140 with grade of "C" or better. Please Note: If you have taken a 1000 level Math Course (or higher) from another institution, and have submitted your official transcript, please contact the Records and Registration Department in order to register for this course.
    Survey of Mathematics orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1031
    Course Title:Math for Elementary Education I or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This is the first of a two-course sequence designed for prospective elementary education majors. Students will develop a deep understanding of elementary mathematics and the ability to effectively communicate mathematical ideas. The course focuses on heuristics for mathematical problem solving in the contexts of place value and number systems; operations with whole numbers, integers, fractions, and decimals; and rates, ratios, proportions, and percentages. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 0900 or 0902 or 0980 or 1010 or 1130 or 1140 with a grade of "C" or better. Please Note: If you have taken a 1000 level Math Course (or higher) from another institution, and have submitted your official transcript, please contact the Records and Registration Department in order to register for this course.
    Math for Elementary Education I orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1032
    Course Title:Math for Elementary Education II or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This is the second of a two-course sequence designed for prospective elementary education majors. Students will develop a deep understanding of elementary mathematics and the ability to effectively communicate mathematical ideas. The course focuses on heuristics for mathematical problem solving and reasoning in the contexts of geometry, measurement, probability, and statistics. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1031 with grade of "C" or better.
    Math for Elementary Education II orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1080
    Course Title:Technical Mathematics or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Technical Mathematics orn/a3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1090
    Course Title:Statway Statistics II or      Goal Areas:02,04       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is the second course in a two-course sequence. Students in this course are required to have taken the preceding course, Math 0990 in the previous semester. Topics for both courses include concepts and methods of statistics with an emphasis on data analysis. Topics include methods for collecting data, graphical and numerical descriptive statistics, correlation, simple linear regression, basic concepts of probability, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests for means and proportions, and chi-square tests.
    Statway Statistics II orView02,04 4
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Elementary Statistics or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This is an introductory course in descriptive statistics, probability, random variables, and inferential statistics. Topics include exploratory data analysis, measures of central tendency, measures of dispersion, linear regression, basic probability, binomial and normal distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. Additional topics may include inferential procedures for two populations, analysis of variance and chi-squared tests. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 0900 or 0902 or 0980 or 1010 or 1031 or 1140 with grade of "C" or better.
    Elementary Statistics orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:Finite Mathematics or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed primarily for the non-science major. Several business and financial applications are covered. These applications may include systems of equations, linear programming (maximizing profit, minimizing cost), the interdependence of different sectors in an economy, and interest rates as they pertain to credit cards, short-term loans, and mortgages. Although some computer applications may be included, no prior experience is necessary. Additional topics may include: introductory statistics and probability, combinatorics (the number of ways of arranging objects), game theory, coding, and Markov chains (multi-step games/decisions). Prerequisite: Placement into Math 902 or successful completion of Math 0900 or 0901 or 0980 or 1010 or 1031 or 1130 with grade of "C" or better. Please Note: If you have taken a 1000 level Math Course (or higher) from another institution, and have submitted your official transcript, please contact the Records and Registration Department in order to register for this course.
    Finite Mathematics orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:College Algebra or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This college-level course continues the study of algebra conducted in the developmental algebra courses. Topics include polynomial, rational, inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions and their applications. Additional topics include systems of non-linear equations, systems of linear equations, and matrices. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 0970 or 0980 with grade of "C" or better
    College Algebra orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Pre-Calculus or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Pre-Calculus orn/a4
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1170
    Course Title:Pre-Calculus or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is a comprehensive course in trigonometry and extended topics in algebra. Topics include trigonometric functions and their graphs, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities and equations, applications of trigonometry, conic sections, the binomial theorem, and sequences and series. Additional topics may include mathematical induction, combinations and permutations, and systems of nonlinear equations. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 1150 with grade of "C" or better
    Pre-Calculus orView04 4
    MATH1180College Algebra and Pre-Calculus or5
    MATH1190Elementary Functions or5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Calculus Survey or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course in differential and integral calculus is designed for those students who require only one semester of calculus. The emphasis is on methods and applications of calculus rather than on theory, with the applications primarily from business. Students who wish to take more than one semester of calculus should enroll in Math 1221. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 1150 or Math 1180 with grade of "C" or better
    Calculus Survey orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1221
    Course Title:Calculus I or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course is a thorough treatment of differentiation and an introduction to integration. Topics include the definition of derivative, limits and continuity, differentiation, applications of the derivative, definite and indefinite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of integration. Prerequisites: College math placement level or successful completion of Math 1170 or Math 1180 with grade of "C" or better
    Calculus I orView04 5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:1222
    Course Title:Calculus II or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course continues the study of the definite and indefinite integrals and leads to a study of improper integrals and infinite series. Topics include advanced techniques of anti-differentiation, numerical integration techniques and error bounding, applications of the integral, improper integrals, an introduction to differential equations, infinite series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1221 with grade of "C" or better
    Calculus II orView04 5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2010
    Course Title:Probability and Statistics or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This is a calculus-based first course in the study of probability and statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, general probability theory, random variables, sampling distributions, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Additional topics may include two-sample inference, linear regression, analysis of categorical data, analysis of variance, and quality and reliability. Prerequisite: Math 1222 with grade of "C" or better
    Probability and Statistics orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2220
    Course Title:Calculus III or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:5

    Course Description:Topics in this course include solid analytic geometry, vectors in space, scalar and vector products, vector functions and derivatives/integrals, multi-variable functions, partial derivatives, alternative coordinate systems, and double and triple integrals. The geometry of space curves, line and surface integrals, cural and gradient divergence, and Stokes' theorem are also included. Emphasis will be on learning relevant mathematical methods. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1222 with a grade of "C" or better
    Calculus III orView04 5
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Linear Algebra or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course includes vectors and vector spaces, matrices, matrix algebra, linear systems of equations, determinants, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1222 with grade of "C" or better
    Linear Algebra orView04 3
    Course Subject: MATH         Course Number:2400
    Course Title:Differential Equations or      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:The content of this course covers first and second ordinary differential equations with applications, higher order linear equations, constant coefficients, differential operators, variation of parameters, power series methods and Laplace transforms. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Math 1222 with grade of "C" or better
    Differential Equations orView04 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Introduction to Logic      Goal Areas:04       Credits:3

    Course Description:Investigation of the principles of deductive and inductive reasoning. The course includes Aristotelian logic, propositional and symbolic logic, validity, invalidity, and proofs. Since this course can be taken to fulfill the Mathematical-Logical Reasoning general education requirement, students should expect a Math-like course, with exercises, and exams.
    Introduction to LogicView04 3
     
    Goal Area 5: History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    History and the Social and Behavioral Sciences - 3 courses, 9 credits
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the nature of culture by studying the forms of conventional behavior (language, ideology, social organization, and technology) and their material manifestations. It also seeks to explain the variation in cultures of representative ethnic groups and societies of present and recent past in terms of ecological adaptation and cultural evolution.
    Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:The Archaeology of Ancient Europe or      Goal Areas:05,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:Anthropology is concerned with the many ways that humans have adapted to their physical and social environments, including the systems of meaning and social organization that they use, as well as the historical development of those adaptions. There are a number of subfields within Anthropology in America: (Archaeology, Physical Anthropology, Linguistics, and applied Anthropology), and this course focuses on the remote past of Europe before the advent of writing (history), as revealed through archaeological research. We will focus primarily on Termperate Europe (north of the Alps), but to do so we will repeatedly run into the sophisticated cultures of the Mediterranean Basin. Evidence will be considered starting with the first people in Europe, through millennia of hunting and gathering, and then then the broad changes that occurred with the advent of agriculture and metal use, and the increasing societal complexity, ending with the coming of the Romans who brought "civilization" to their northern neighbors.
    The Archaeology of Ancient Europe orView05,10 3
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:Anthropology of Religion or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course involves the study and comparison of religious institutions from a wide variety of cultures. We will consider the wonderful array of beliefs and practices of humanity. We will consider religion, magic, and witchcraft, and how these cultural constructions shed light on the societies in which they were created. Through seminar-style discussions of a variety of essays on religion and some videos, students will engage with the material on a deeper level than they normally would in a lecture format. Throughout the course, students will learn about the development of a wide variety of religious group identities, and their changing meanings across a wide range of cultures, and periods of history. They will learn about the dynamics of social stratification that religious groups experience today. Students will study the diversity of religion, and the racism and bigotry that often plagues peoples ideas and behavior towards other religious groups. This material will bring to light the institutional exclusion and discrimination that certain groups have endured. This course involves the study and comparison of religious institutions from a wide variety of cultures. We will consider the wonderful array of beliefs and practices of humanity. We will consider religion, magic, and witchcraft, and how these cultural constructions shed light on the societies in which they were created. Through seminar-style discussions of a variety of essays on religion and some videos, students will engage with the material on a deeper level than they normally would in a lecture format. Throughout the course, students will learn about the development of a wide variety of religious group identities, and their changing meanings across a wide range of cultures, and periods of history. They will learn about the dynamics of social stratification that religious groups experience today. Students will study the diversity of religion, and the racism and bigotry that often plagues peoples ideas and behavior towards other religious groups. This material will bring to light the institutional exclusion and discrimination that certain groups have endured. Through the consideration and discussion of numerous religious groups of America and beyond, students will learn the role(s) that these groups have played in our culture, and contributions they have made. Through presenting their two research projects to the class, students will exercise communication skills that involve great tact in discussing religious practices in a neutral and objective manner. We will practice those skills every class, in our seminar discussions of the reading. These discussions will get directly at the disparate explanatory systems offered by world religions, compare them, and critique the various views. In these ways, students will be using the method and data that anthropologists employ in the investigation of religion.
    Anthropology of Religion orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Economics of Crime or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers economics theories of crime and justice. Crime topics include: illegal drug markets, violent crime, nonviolent crime, and international crime. Economic theories and concepts such as rationality, efficiency, supply, and demand are used. The course includes international and historical comparisons of enforcement techniques from both an economic efficiency framework and an ethical perspective.
    Economics of Crime orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:Principles of Macroeconomics or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers mainstream theories, the economy's recent performance, national income and output levels, money and the banking system, inflation and unemployment, fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international trade.
    Principles of Macroeconomics orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Principles of Microeconomics or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers theories of consumer and producer behavior as well as market structure, the role of government in the economy, distribution of income, externalities, and taxes.
    Principles of Microeconomics orView05 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:World History: Origins to 1300 or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines world history from its origins to end of the 13th century. Although it is important for students of world history to have a nuanced understanding of cultures, states, and other entities that constitute the fabric of human history, the primary focus of the world historian is the study of phenomena that transcends single states, regions, or cultures. In other words, world history is not the study of the histories of discrete cultures and states one after another and in isolation from one another: world history is transregional, transnational, and transcultural. As long as one focuses on the big picture of cultural interchange and/or comparative history, one is a practicing world historian.
    World History: Origins to 1300 orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:World History: 1300 to Present or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines world history from the 14th century to the present. Although it is important for students of world history to have a nuanced understanding of cultures, states, and other entities that constitute the fabric of human history, the primary focus of the world historian is the study of phenomena that transcends single states, regions, or cultures. In other words, world history is not the study of the histories of discrete cultures and states one after another and in isolation from one another: world history is transregional, transnational, and transcultural. As long as one focuses on the big picture of cultural interchange and/or comparative history, one is a practicing world historian.
    World History: 1300 to Present orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Colonial History of the Americas or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the human migratory phase that led to the initial peopling of the Americas beginning ca. 35,000 BCE; it explores the first colonial period that began ca. 7500 BCE with the rise of domesticated agriculture and the consequent establishment of major civilizations in South America, Meso-America, and North America; and it covers the second colonial period initiated by the arrival of the Spanish in 1492 and that began drawing to a conclusion in the late eighteenth century. Study of the second colonial period includes the colonization of North America, Central America, The Caribbean, and South America by six European empires: the Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, Russian, and English.
    Colonial History of the Americas orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:History of Western Civilization Pre 1550 or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the development of Western Civilization from ancient origins through the Reformation. We will consider various "western" civilizations ranging from ancient Mesopotamian civilizations to Early Modern Europe, following a chronological progression, while maintaining a broad geographic scope. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the different Western civilizations and the periods in which they flourished, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence.
    History of Western Civilization Pre 1550 orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:History of Western Civilization 1550 to Present or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. The course will focus on social, political, and cultural developments in Europe, covering topics such as the Industrial Revolution and Globalization in the 20th century. The course will also examine how these developments affected the rest of the world. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.
    History of Western Civilization 1550 to Present orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:History of the Medieval West or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the development of the three major Western cultures that emerged during the Middle Ages: Western Europe, Byzantium, and Islam. Specific emphasis will be given to the interactions between these three cultures, both positive and negative. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.
    History of the Medieval West orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:History of the Ancient West or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the origins and development of civilizations surrounding the Mediterranean, such as the Egyptians, Hittites, Greeks, and Romans, during the ancient period, from about 3000 BC through about AD 300. The course will explore the contact between the various ancient civilizations, and will seek to understand both the tendency toward empire-creation in the ancient world, and the proclivity of those empires to collapse. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.
    History of the Ancient West orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:History of United States Through 1877 or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the major cultural, social, and political issues in United States history from the revolutionary period through Reconstruction. We look at the ideas that led to the revolution, how the thirteen colonies assembled themselves into a republic, the consequences of slave culture to the course of American history, and the promises and failures of Reconstruction. The student will come to understand the multiple and inter-related forces relevant to the early years of the republic.
    History of United States Through 1877 orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:History of the United States Since 1877 or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the major social and cultural issues in United This course focuses on the major cultural, social and political issues in United States history from the late nineteenth century Gilded Age through the end of the twentieth century. We look at the influence of the industrial revolution, the impact of increasing levels of European and Asian immigration, the rise of organized labor, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the impact of United States foreign policy, and countercultural movements. The student will gain insight into the aspects that are most crucial for a solid understanding of the nation's history.
    History of the United States Since 1877 orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:American Colonial History or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Colonial History orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1240
    Course Title:History of the American West or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    History of the American West orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1270
    Course Title:Race in America or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course investigates the role played by race in the shaping of United States history. We examine the concept of race and the historical relationships in America between those of African, Asian, European, and Native descents. We will examine Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Movement and current racial issues. The goal is to broaden student understanding of United States history by a focused study of its multi-faceted racial relationships throughout the centuries.
    Race in America orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1700
    Course Title:History and Popular Culture or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    History and Popular Culture orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1800
    Course Title:History of Minnesota or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    History of Minnesota orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1900
    Course Title:Family History Research Methods or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Family History Research Methods orn/a1
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:2500
    Course Title:World Regional History or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Each semester this course is devoted to the history of a specific world region, and the region will change from semester to semester. The goal is to provide the student with the opportunity for an in-depth study of specific societies and specific cultures from around the world. The course may be repeated for credit under a different subtitle as the subject matter changes.
    World Regional History orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:2600
    Course Title:Intellectual History or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will examine cultural, religious, artistic, and scientific ideas in their historical contexts, explore arguments regarding the manner in which particular ideas both reflect and create the values of their own time, and investigate the manner in which certain ideas are viewed retrospectively from various subsequent historical periods. The class will read a variety of intellectual and imaginative works that will illustrate the process by which ideas are transmitted historically, and specific ideas considered will include but will not be limited to fundamentalism, nationalism, romanticism, and totalitarianism.
    Intellectual History orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:2700
    Course Title:History and Popular Culture or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the relationship between history and popular culture, with an emphasis on the value of popular culture entertainment as a historical source for both the past and the present. We will examine several examples of popular culture entertainment (including but not limited to film, novels, comics, etc) that are set in a historical period. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the historical periods depicted in selected popular culture sources, as well as the historical periods in which the sources were produced. Students will also examine questions of ethical representation of the past in popular culture. Through this course, students will begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze various types of sources as historical evidence. It is recommended that students complete a 1000-level history course and a semester of college English before taking this course.
    History and Popular Culture orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1100
    Course Title:American Government and Politics or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a general introduction to American politics with emphasis on the Constitution, citizen participation, elections, and the role of the major governmental institutions - Congress, presidency and judiciary - in the formulation of public policy in the United States.
    American Government and Politics orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:State and Local Politics or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies the operation and structure of state governments including executive, legislative, judicial functions as well as elections and policy formation, with an emphasis on Minnesota.
    State and Local Politics orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1600
    Course Title:Comparative Politics or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines and compares the organization and politics of modern governments around the world. Countries studied exemplify larger course themes of political institutions, political culture, elections, public policy, democratization, economic development, and comparative methodology.
    Comparative Politics orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1700
    Course Title:World Politics or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a general introduction to international relations with emphasis on great power politics, international organizations, security studies, international political economy, and global environmental politics.
    World Politics orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:2130
    Course Title:Constitutional Law or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will acquaint students with the content of the United States Constitution and its amendments; its interpretations within political, social, and historical contexts; and will examine the reasoning process in major judicial decisions. Prerequisite: Soc 1710 or PolS 1100
    Constitutional Law orView05 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Psychology of Adjustment or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Psychology of Adjustment orn/a3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:General Psychology or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides an overview of topics in psychology. Topics may include history of psychology, research methods, physiological psychology, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning, memory, motivation and emotion, personality, stress and coping, abnormal behavior, therapy, and social psychology. Students are strongly encouraged to check with an advisor to determine if this is the appropriate course for their degree/program.
    General Psychology orView05 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Introduction to Psychology or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course provides an in-depth introduction to psychology. Topics may include history of psychology; research methods; physiological psychology; sensation and perception; consciousness; learning; memory; cognition; motivation; emotion; personality; stress, health and coping; abnormal behavior, therapy; social psychology; human development; sexuality; and gender. Students are strongly encouraged to check with an advisor to determine if this is the appropriate course for their degree/program.
    Introduction to Psychology orView05 4
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1165
    Course Title:Psychology of Adjustment or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an in-depth look at the processes of normal human adjustment and their application in the student's life adjustment. A component of the course is diversity and dealing with diversity, specifically the development and changing group identities in the U. S.; an examination of the individual and institutional processes of unequal power between groups; an examination of the students' attitudes, behavior and beliefs about diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, bias and racism and bigotry; and experience in developing the necessary communication skills for living and working in a diverse society. Other topics may include goal setting and change processes, self-awareness and identity, physical and psychological health, stress and coping, interpersonal relationships and communication, emotions and motivation, social interactions, psychological growth and development, meaning and values, and decision making.
    Psychology of Adjustment orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1170
    Course Title:Psychology of Gender or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Psychology of Gender includes the theory and research relating to sexuality, gender roles and sexual orientation.
    Psychology of Gender orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Child Development or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on psychological, intellectual, and physical development from the prenatal period through adolescence. Topics include general theoretical approaches and research methods in studying child and adolescent development, birth and the newborn child, and development in the following areas: prenatal, physical, perceptual, cognitive, intellectual, language, personality, social and atypical. Completion of General Psychology is helpful prior to taking this course.
    Child Development orView05 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Adult Development or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:As a psychological journey through the stages of adulthood, this course covers individual differences in adjustment strategies used to cope with typical problems from early adulthood to the time of dying and death.
    Adult Development orView05 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1250
    Course Title:Life Span Developmental Psychology or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:4

    Course Description:Life Span Developmental Psychology examines continuity and change across the life span. The course examines the biological, cognitive, and social development of humans from conception through death. Topics will explore maturation, human growth experiences, transitions, and the various stages of psychological and physical development as key components influencing human behaviors.
    Life Span Developmental Psychology orView05 4
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2110
    Course Title:Principles of Social Psychology or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course analyzes how individual's thoughts, feelings and actions are influenced by others. Topics include perception, attraction, altruism, aggression, attitudes, leadership, conformity and obedience, stereotyping and prejudice, persuasion and propaganda and the self-concept. Prerequisite: Soc 1110 or Psyc 1160 or Permission from Instructor
    Principles of Social Psychology orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2320
    Course Title:Psychological Disorders or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the origin, classification, and treatment of psychological disorders. Topics include historical and research issues, adjustment reactions to stress, neuroses, personality disorders, psychoses, types of psychotherapy, legal and ethical issues. Formerly Titled: Abnormal Psychology Prerequisite: Psyc 1150 or Psyc 1160 or consent of instructor
    Psychological Disorders orView05 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2330
    Course Title:Personality Psychology or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides a review of the major theories of personality which typically include the psychodynamic, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic and trait approaches. Prerequisite: Psyc 1150 or Psyc 1160 or consent of instructor
    Personality Psychology orView05 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2340
    Course Title:Human Sexuality or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:An overview of past and current research on human sexuality. The course will address: the human sexual response; models and sources of arousal; cultural influences on human sexual behavior and sexual diversity; emotional aspects of sexuality and sexual dysfunction; sexual communication, intimacy, dependency and jealousy; sexual exploration and courting behavior across the life span; atypical behavior, commercialized sex, and sexual coercion. Prerequisite: Psyc 1150
    Human Sexuality orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Multicultural Psychology or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to diversity and multiculturalism within psychology. Students will have a broad understanding of extant research on diversity from a wide variety of perspectives including international perspectives. Topics covered include: culture and identity, group behavior, stereotyping and prejudice, cross-cultural research, and international research. COMM 1310 is highly recommended before taking this course. Prerequisite: Psyc 1150 or Psyc 1160 or consent of instructor
    Multicultural Psychology orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Introduction to Sociology or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of social and cultural aspects of human behavior. Topics include society and culture, roles and norms, groups and organizations, deviance, inequality, social and cultural change, and research methods.
    Introduction to Sociology orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1710
    Course Title:Introduction to Criminal Justice or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the history, organization, and function of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics include foundations of crime and justice, victimization, crime statistics and the extent of crime, police issues, court systems, corrections, and future trends. Note: Sociology 1110 recommended prior to taking this course.
    Introduction to Criminal Justice orView05 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1750
    Course Title:Families in Crisis or      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course analyzes the dimensions and dynamics of family dysfunctions. Topics may include, domestic abuse, child abuse and protection, vulnerable adults, peace officer response to crime victims, Americans with Disabilities Act as it relates to peace officers, mental health, poverty, homelessness, and the substance abuse as related to family issues. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Families in Crisis orView05 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2110
    Course Title:Principles of Social Psychology or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course analyzes how individual's thoughts, feelings and actions are influenced by others. Topics include perception, attraction, altruism, aggression, attitudes, leadership, conformity and obedience, persuasion and propaganda and the self-concept. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Principles of Social Psychology orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2200
    Course Title:Family Violence or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Family Violence orn/a3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2210
    Course Title:Social Inequality or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course considers the social history, current conditions, and future prospects of minority groups in the United States. Topics include racism, sexism, prejudice, discrimination, affirmative action, and other related issues and social policies. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Social Inequality orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2410
    Course Title:Women in Global Perspectives or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Women in Global Perspectives orn/a3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2730
    Course Title:Introduction to Corrections      Goal Areas:05       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines corrections as a major component of the criminal justice system in the United States. Topics may include programs, practices and critical issues. Prerequisite: Soc 1710 or Consent of Instructor
    Introduction to CorrectionsView05 3
     
    Goal Area 6: The Humanities and Fine Arts
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Humanities and Fine Arts - 3 courses, 9 credits, from at least 2 different disciplines
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Women in American Society I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Women in American Society I orn/a3
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Women in American Society II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Women in American Society II orn/a3
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:2210
    Course Title:American Studies Topics I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Studies Topics I orn/a3
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:2220
    Course Title:American Studies Topics II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Studies Topics II orn/a3
    Course Subject: ARBC         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Arab Cultures or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course discusses the history and culture of the Arab world, examining various aspects of this rich and venerable civilization, the importance attached to education, the achievements of Arab science and also the internal conflicts, wide-spread poverty, and the role of women. This course is also an introduction to how the religion of Islam created a far-flung Arab Muslim world that embraces lands reaching from the shores of the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean, and examines how social institutions and culture are intertwined with politics and economics. This course is taught in English; no previous knowledge of Arabic language is required.
    Arab Cultures orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Introduction to Art or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the basic concepts of the visual arts, the organization of art forms, and the historical development of architecture, painting, and sculpture with an emphasis on contemporary art. A general world view of art is presented through lecture and discussion. Students will investigate the creative aspects of the visual arts through in-class examples and a field trip to a Twin Cities museum.
    Introduction to Art orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1101
    Course Title:Photography I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This is an introduction to the fundamentals of black and white photography. Both technical and creative skills are developed in the use of the camera, exposing and developing film, enlarging and finishing the black and white photograph. Class critiques help articulate individual visual growth while artist presentations and field trips to galleries and museums help acquaint students with significant photographers. Students use film-based cameras with adjustable shutter speed and f-stop. A limited number of cameras are available for rental.
    Photography I orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1102
    Course Title:Photography II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is for students with a basic background in camera operations and darkroom procedures. There is a greater emphasis on the photograph as a fine print, the student's personal growth and perceptions in the medium. Class time will include discussions, slide shows and guest lectures. Students must have a film-based camera with adjustable shutter speed and f-stop. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Art 1101
    Photography II orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Digital Photography or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:A logical sequence to Art 1101 or 1140, this class emphasizes the computer as a digital darkroom to create photographic images through the traditional camera or a digital camera. ): Course content includes an overview of basic photographic techniques and a rigorous examination of Adobe Photoshop through assignments and personal exploration, class critiques and artist presentations, to help student understanding of photographic art. Students must have their own digital or analog camera.
    Digital Photography orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1170
    Course Title:Advanced Photography or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course blends traditional and digital photography introducing a variety of both film based and digital technology to support creative and personal visual investigation. Prerequisites: Art 1101 and/or Art 1160
    Advanced Photography orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1270
    Course Title:Digital Video Production or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces basic video production concepts and techniques with an emphasis on using the elements of motion and sound as creative artistic tools. Students will critically analyze video in terms of genre, context, meaning, visual language and form and then produce and edit their own short projects that explore creative and experimental applications of the medium rather than the traditional mass communication form. Students are encouraged to use their own computer for editing if possible. Basic knowledge of the computer is helpful.
    Digital Video Production orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1301
    Course Title:Two Dimensional Design I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces a visual vocabulary and tools essential for all flat design and space, and investigates basic principles related to composition, pattern making, illusory space, and self expression. Various techniques and materials are explored including paint, pencil, pen, brush, and pastels. This course also introduces students to artists and design elements from a variety of cultures. Strongly recommend taking Drawing I before this course.
    Two Dimensional Design I orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1302
    Course Title:Two Dimensional Design II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course expands the study of flat design with emphasis on solving design problems. Students will be engaged in the more complicated tasks of integrating contrasting elements such as nonobjective and objective shapes, naturalism and idealism, shape and mass. Personal expression, design development and visual thinking as well as specialized techniques and materials are included. Design from different cultures and different artists will be discussed. Prerequisite: Art 1301
    Two Dimensional Design II orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:Three Dimensional Design or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:As an introduction to the basic language of three-dimensional design, this course includes constructive, additive, subtractive and substitution techniques using traditional and contemporary media. Various methods of presentation are explored ranging from small freestanding works to site-specific models and proposals.
    Three Dimensional Design orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:Introduction to Sculpture or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a specialized study on an individual basis in wood, metals, plaster, clay, stone or mixed media. The student will work with the sculptural possibilities of these materials and refine their ability to work in one particular medium.
    Introduction to Sculpture orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1340
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Color or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:The course teaches fundamental color theory by introducing the physical, perceptual, and artistic aspects of color. The dimensions of color are explored through theory and practice using paint and colored papers. Students also are introduced to the theories of the physiology and the psychology of color reception, cultural taste and preferences as they relate to color choices, and the color usage of well known artists, of art movements, and of different world cultures. Strongly recommend taking Drawing I before this course.
    Fundamentals of Color orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1341
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Color I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Fundamentals of Color I orn/a3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1361
    Course Title:Ceramics I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Ceramics is an introductory studio course that presents students with a fundamental understanding of the hand building and wheel throwing processes in clay. This course will focus on a creative and imaginative approach to solving visual problems in clay. Ceramics will introduce all methods of forming clay including pinch, throwing, coil and slab building.
    Ceramics I orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1362
    Course Title:Ceramics II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Ceramics II is an advanced studio course that presents students with an in-depth understanding of the hand building and wheel throwing processes in clay. This course emphasizes student's development of a personal creative style taking an imaginative approach to solving visual problems in clay. Ceramics ll will introduce all methods of forming clay combining pinch, throwing, coil and slab building with comprehensive glazing techniques. Prerequisite: Art 1361
    Ceramics II orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1401
    Course Title:Drawing I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces basic drawing concepts such as line, value, gesture, proportion, composition, and space; and techniques using traditional and contemporary drawing media. A variety of subjects from still life, architectural forms, nature and the human figure are used as inspiration for the student's drawings. Students will also be introduced to the art of important artists who have used drawing successfully in their work.
    Drawing I orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1402
    Course Title:Drawing II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course continues the study of drawing concepts using various media to explore color, the human figure, and representational as well as non-representational subject matter. Personal expression is emphasized. Students will examine the art of important artists who have used drawing successfully in their work. Prerequisite: Art 1401
    Drawing II orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1770
    Course Title:Quilt Arts or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This class explores the visual and expressive possibilities of quilting as a fine art. Students will solve design problems using fabric. Traditional and non-traditional quilting techniques will be used to enhance personal expression and to create innovative visual communications.
    Quilt Arts orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1810
    Course Title:Studio Art Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:The 1-credit Studio Art Workshop is a basic studio course that presents to art and non-art students the fundamentals required to complete projects in a particular art medium or art application process. The class covers fundamental technical use as well as incorporating personal aesthetics into ones output in the medium. NOTE: The particular medium covered in a given semester will be noted on the semester class schedule but will not show up in the student transcript. Students desiring to transfer this course may need to obtain a copy of the course syllabus to show the particular medium emphasized in a given semester. This course is repeatable for credit.
    Studio Art Workshop orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1820
    Course Title:Studio Art Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:The 2-credit Studio Art Workshop is a studio course that presents to art and non-art students the fundamentals required to complete projects in a particular art medium or art application process. The class covers fundamental technical use as well as incorporating personal aesthetics into ones output in the medium. In addition, this class helps students see the creative process as a method of developing a concept and solving related problems. Aesthetic Critique and artistic reflection is a component of this class. NOTE: the particular medium used will be noted on the semester schedule but will not show up in the student transcript. Students desiring to transfer this course may need to obtain a copy of the course syllabus to show the particular medium emphasized in a given semester. This course is repeatable for credit.
    Studio Art Workshop orView06 2
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2180
    Course Title:Art History: Pre-History to the Age of Cathedrals or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines painting, sculpture and architecture of cultures from prehistory to the end of the 15th Century. While the emphasis is on developments in Western art, the course includes overviews of the arts of Asia, Africa and the Americas. Museum visits support the lectures and text.
    Art History: Pre-History to the Age of Cathedrals orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2190
    Course Title:Art History: Renaissance to 21st Century Art or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines painting, sculpture and architecture of cultures from the 16th century to the present, as well as new media of the modern era. While the emphasis is on developments in Europe and the United States, the course will include overviews of the arts of Asia, Africa and the Americas. Museum visits support the lectures and text.
    Art History: Renaissance to 21st Century Art orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Architectural History or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is a survey of the history of Western architecture from pre-history to the present day. The student will gain knowledge and understandings of the characteristics of the architecture of Western cultures, the ideas and intentions which motivated builders, as well as terminology related to architectural design and construction.
    Architectural History orView06,08 2
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2611
    Course Title:Painting I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the basic skills and techniques of painting. The study of paint and materials, the use of color in painting and the development of ideas are important elements in this class. Exploration of realism, abstraction and contemporary painting are all important aspects of Painting I. Recommended: Art 1340.
    Painting I orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2612
    Course Title:Painting II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Using advanced painting techniques, this course emphasizes student's development of a personal style. Prerequisite: Art 2611
    Painting II orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2640
    Course Title:Watercolor or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the basic skills and techniques of watercolor painting. The special characteristics of watercolor application will be explored to create both traditional and abstract results.
    Watercolor orView06 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2740
    Course Title:Jewelry Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This workshop is a basic introduction to rudimentary jewelry-making techniques which includes fabrication of metals through hand piercing, sawing, forging, soldering, riveting and forming raw materials such as silver, copper, brass and found objects. May be repeated for credit.
    Jewelry Workshop orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2750
    Course Title:Ceramics Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:Ceramics Workshop is a basic studio course for art and non-art students which provides a fundamental understanding of the hand building and wheel throwing processes in clay. Ceramics Workshop will introduce all methods of forming clay including pinch, throwing, coil and slab building. This course is repeatable for credit.
    Ceramics Workshop orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2780
    Course Title:Quiltmaking Workshop or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Quiltmaking Workshop orn/a1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2781
    Course Title:Quiltmaking Workshop I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This is a basic workshop introducing the processes and technical skills of quilting along with an introduction to artistic principles such as color, texture, line, form, and composition. Students are also introduced to information about the history of quilting and the cultural connections quilting holds within our society.
    Quiltmaking Workshop I orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2782
    Course Title:Quiltmaking Workshop II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This is an advanced workshop which further develops the processes and technical skills of quilting along with artistic principles such as color, texture, line, form, and composition. This course may be repeated for credit.
    Quiltmaking Workshop II orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2800
    Course Title:Painting Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This is a basic course in painting. The emphasis of this course is on painting procedures, color use and composition, but students also will explore the connection of art to historical context. Subject matter, visual elements and principles, and technique will be explored.
    Painting Workshop orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2820
    Course Title:Drawing Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This workshop is an introduction to basic concepts in drawing and visual perception using traditional drawing materials and techniques.
    Drawing Workshop orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2860
    Course Title:Photography Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This basic course is an intensive, personal exploration of various photo-related topics for those who wish a sampler. Topics for separate workshops are color photography, digital photography, nature and landscape photography, among others.
    Photography Workshop orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2900
    Course Title:Studio Arts Capstone Practicum or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is intended for students who have completed a significant portion of coursework in the Studio Arts AFA program and are within a semester of completion. It is a capstone experience in which students will refine their skills in portfolio building, artistic presentation in the professional arts world, resume building, critique skills, exhibition preparation, and use of web resources for artists' representation. Students will work closely with faculty to integrate concepts learned throughout their program into a final portfolio of work in preparation for continued study or work. Prerequisites: Art 1301, Art 1310, Art 1340, and Art 1401
    Studio Arts Capstone Practicum orView06 1
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2970
    Course Title:Art Appreciation Field Trip or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course consists of tours to various cultural centers to experience a variety of art exhibits, lectures, demonstrations and facilities. This course may be repeated for credit. Students will need to provide their own transportation to Twin Cities area museums or galleries.
    Art Appreciation Field Trip orView06 1
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:Introduction to Literature or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of literatures and to means to credibly examine that literature. It thus includes literary terms, critical approaches and their application to literature.
    Introduction to Literature orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1250
    Course Title:Magazine Workshop or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:This workshop offers students the opportunity to gain practical editorial experience by working on the college literary/arts magazine. As members of the editorial staff, students will solicit, select, and edit stories, essays and poems for publication. May be repeated for credit.
    Magazine Workshop orView06 2
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1400
    Course Title:Reading Poetry or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of poetry: the reading and analysis of poetic works from a variety of time periods and cultures. Important figures, poetic traditions and movements, formal techniques, and other methods of evoking mood and meaning will be explored through discussion and in both written and oral projects throughout the semester.
    Reading Poetry orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1450
    Course Title:Reading Plays or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a survey of drama as literature; plays will be read as literary texts, not as the grounds for specific performances or performance practices. Through their engagements with the dramatic literature in this course, students will be introduced to a diversity of dramatic styles and themes. Attention will also be devoted to the social and cultural contexts in which the plays were written and in which they are read. Course materials may be organized either historically or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Reading Plays orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1900
    Course Title:Introduction to Creative Writing or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This class is designed for students who want to try creative writing, perhaps for the first time, and learn more about the creative process. No previous creative writing experience is necessary. Coursework will include reading, writing, and discussion of both student and professional work in at least three of the following genres: fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction (or memoir), and drama. The focus of the class, students' creative work, will be presented and critiqued in a workshop environment.
    Introduction to Creative Writing orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1950
    Course Title:Graphic Novels or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to the diverse body of literature known as "graphic novels." While emphasis will be placed on works that are specifically considered graphic novels, it may also include the study of other comics-strips and books-that have significantly contributed to the development of the form. Students can expect to be exposed not only to a wide range of graphic novel types, such as autobiography, journalism, history, humor, dramatic fiction, manga, and superheroes, but also to a deeper understanding of the methods of telling stories that are unique to comics.
    Graphic Novels orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2010
    Course Title:Writing Creative Non-Fiction and Memoir or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course offers beginning instruction in the art of writing creative non-fiction, which includes the personal essay, literary journalism, and other hybrid forms, as well as memoir writing. Students will read and analyze the work of professional writers, explore a variety of techniques for discovering material and topics, and experience workshop peer review of their work. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Writing Creative Non-Fiction and Memoir orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2020
    Course Title:Writing Stories or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course offers beginning instruction in the art of writing fiction. Exploring techniques for generating material, engaging in writing exercises, and critically examining contemporary short fiction are important aspects of this course. Students will develop a portfolio of their writing and will critique others' work in a writing workshop environment. Prerequisite: Engl 1201 or 1200
    Writing Stories orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2030
    Course Title:Writing Poetry or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Beginning instruction in the art of poetry. Exploring techniques for generating material, engaging in writing exercises both in and out of class, and discussing examples of contemporary poetry are important aspects of this class. Students will draft a collection of poems and critique others' work in a writing workshop environment.
    Writing Poetry orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2270
    Course Title:Modern American Literature or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to selected American writers of the twentieth and/or twenty-first centuries and their works. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or 1201
    Modern American Literature orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Children's Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:In this course, students will have the pleasure of reading, discussing and evaluating childrens literature ranging from the picture book to the young adult novel. Students will explore the history of childrens literature, critical responses to it and its specific role for children and adults. Students will examine works from the genre that might include picture books, chapter books, folktales, fantasy, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry and nonfiction with an emphasis on how the genre and its themes have evolved over time, paying particular attention to how those themes address the role of children in society. This course will appeal to students, parents and educators. Prerequisite: Assessment score placement in Adev 0951 or above, ENGL 0950 or above, or ESOL 1230 or above. Recommendation: Completion of ENGL 1201 with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Children's Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2310
    Course Title:American Short Story or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:The short story is a form that was created and refined by American writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will study American short story writers, their stories, and their views of American life.
    American Short Story orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2320
    Course Title:Writing: From Structure to Style or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the structure of language as well how its rules and applications affect written communication and authorial choices in professional and academic settings. The course further intends to create confidence in written and oral expression, to support students in business, graphic arts, paralegal, and other programs. Prerequisite: Engl 1201
    Writing: From Structure to Style orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2330
    Course Title:Hmong American Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Hmong American Literature explores the works of Hmong writers as represented in the novel, nonfiction, short stories, poetry, drama/film, and Paj Ntaub (stories recorded in tapestry). To a more limited extent, characterizations of Hmong in works by non-Hmong authors may be considered, as well as relevant works by Laotian American and Asian American writers.
    Hmong American Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2340
    Course Title:Nature in Literature or      Goal Areas:06,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course surveys literature that examines the relation between human beings and the natural world as that relationship has been variously conceived by British, American, and other writers. The literary works studied may begin with the pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance and focus on literature from the late eighteenth-century, nineteenth century, and contemporary works. The primary consideration of this course is on how a literary idea of nature has been affected and effected by variations in culture, namely, changes in politics, economics, and technology that in diverse cultural and historical contexts have created conflicts between ecological and human interests. Ultimately this study leads to considering how the "green language" created by the writers under study has contributed to an eco-critical ethic that allows examination of current ecological sensibilities and the language that represents them. The course may also engage oriental literature, for many American and British authors have aligned their thinking on nature with eastern religions. Additionally, the content will reference painters, philosophers, and composers whose works contribute a relevant understanding of nature-as they may lead into relevant scientific considerations of nature. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Nature in Literature orView06,10 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Women and Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course explores women as characters in and writers of literature, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. The course may also address issues of historical context, gender, class and race as a way of understanding women in literature.
    Women and Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2360
    Course Title:Global Literary Perspectives or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will interpret world literature and film (either in translation or originally written in English) that present culturally diverse voices and viewpoints. Special attention will be given to colonial and postcolonial literatures that reflect the immigrant communities of Twin Cities college campuses, such as Egyptian, Finnish, Ethiopian, Hmong, Icelandic, Iranian, Korean, Liberian, Mexican, Norwegian, Russian, Somali, Swedish, and Vietnamese. Prerequisite: Placement into Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Global Literary Perspectives orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2370
    Course Title:African American Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the student to the writings of African-Americans from the colonial period to the present and explores the contributions of these writers to American culture, letters, and life. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically.
    African American Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2380
    Course Title:American Indian Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the students to North American Native American Literature. Readings may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, songs, mythology, and film from traditional and contemporary authors. Special attention may be given to Native American authors with Minnesota connections, such as Louise Erdrich, David Treuer, and Susan Power.
    American Indian Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2390
    Course Title:American Working-Class Literature or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description: This course, providing much needed exposure to a largely overlooked body of writings, introduces students to a variety of classical and contemporary working-class texts that demonstrate literatures rich engagement with industrial, agricultural, domestic, and/or other labor in the United States. Encompassing writings by and about laborers and persons associated with labor, working-class literature reveals the often hidden ways that the material conditions and cultural expectations tied to class and work influence the shape of daily life and its literary expressions. Featuring textual, visual, and/or audio cultural productions, the course is designed to examine the problems and questions raised by working-class texts, which may include the changing nature of work, the dynamic experience of class, the historical circumstances that structure class, the intersection of literature and labor movements, the unstable definitions of literature, and the political dimensions of literature. The course may be organized historically or topically.
    American Working-Class Literature orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2450
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary developments (e.g. sentimentalism, gothic fiction, romanticism, transcendentalism) and key historical and social contexts, from the pre-colonial period to 1860. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature I orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2460
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature II or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary movements (e.g. local color, realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism) and social and historical contexts, from 1860 to the present. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature II orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2500
    Course Title:Playwrighting or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of writing theatrical plays. They will be expected to work on several creative projects throughout the semester and to participate in workshops in which they will discuss and critique one another's work. Students may also be asked to complete other writing exercises and to analyze a selection of plays to gain a better understanding of the art of playwrighting. Prerequisite: Engl 1900
    Playwrighting orView06 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2550
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from its beginnings to 1785. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and Swift, among others, are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended.
    Survey of British Literature I orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2560
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature II or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from 1785 through the 20th century. The literature of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended
    Survey of British Literature II orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2580
    Course Title:Shakespeare's Plays or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:A study of the major plays of William Shakespeare that may include a close reading of the plays, consideration of acting methods, and evaluation of cinematic and theatrical presentations. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Shakespeare's Plays orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2590
    Course Title:Shakespeare Plays II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Shakespeare Plays II orn/a3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2900
    Course Title:Fantasy Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to fantasy as a literary genre. It will expose students to various types of fantasy stories (such as high fantasy, sword and sorcery, urban fantasy, and/or fantasy horror). It will also address how fantasy literature can reflect or comment on issues in the real world, including how various forms of bigotry can be challenged or normalized by fantasy texts.
    Fantasy Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2950
    Course Title:Mystery and Detective Fiction or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to mystery and detective fiction as a literary genre and as popular literature, examining the conventions of suspense writing, possibly including hook, twist, red herring, back story, sub-plot, procedural, clues, and the ethical concerns of investigative methods and civic life. Discussion of various sub-genre styles will engage students in critical thinking applied to historical era, culturally diverse contexts, and gender roles in mystery writing.
    Mystery and Detective Fiction orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Introduction to Japanese Culture or      Goal Areas:06,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to and interdisciplinary exploration of Japanese culture. Through the study of Japanese humanities and fine arts, people and the environment, students will identify what makes Japanese Culture so unique and how the Japanese Mind/Spirit (nihon no kokoro) and their connection to the environment and other non-human species has shaped Japanese society from days of old to the present.
    Introduction to Japanese Culture orView06,10 3
    Course Subject: GERM         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Culture of the German-Speaking Countries or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Culture of the German-Speaking Countries orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Introduction to Japanese Culture or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Introduction to Japanese Culture orn/a3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:College Choir or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course includes the study and performance of choral repertoire. Through active learning students will participate in collaborative artistic study culminating in choral performance of works from a variety of cultures and historical periods. The day section of choir meets twice per week and the night section of choir meets once per week. May be repeated for credit.
    College Choir orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Large Instrumental Ensemble or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is an instrumental performance ensemble that plays a variety of musical literature. Enrollment is open to all students who are able to minimally play their instrument at a High School level. The ensemble is open to all students who meet this criterion. Students should provide their own instrument. Percussionists should provide their own sticks/mallets. This group meets once/week. May be repeated for credit. NOTE: Student should be able to minimally play instrument at a High School level NOTE: Student should be able to minimally play their instrument at a High School level
    Large Instrumental Ensemble orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1170
    Course Title:Instrumental Jazz Ensemble or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is an instrumental performance ensemble that plays a variety of jazz literature. Enrollment is open to all students who are able to read written musical notation for their instrument. Ensemble is open to all students. Students should provide their own instrument. This group meets once per week. May be repeated for credit. NOTE: Student should be able to minimally play instrument at a High School level
    Instrumental Jazz Ensemble orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1180
    Course Title:Small Group Performance Ensemble or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is a small ensemble performance opportunity. An ensemble work may be made up of strings, percussion, winds, guitars, voice, or any instrumental grouping that may be possible depending on need and interest. Depending on their primary instrument, a student will be placed in a section of this course that corresponds to their instrument. The ensemble will play a variety of composed and/or improvised literature. Primarily for AFA music students, the course is open to all who have the ability to read musical notation and perform competently. However, permission for placement into the course is required. Music faculty must be consulted for placement in the appropriate section. Weekly rehearsals and end-of-semester performance is required. Additional rehearsals may be required. May be repeated for credit.
    Small Group Performance Ensemble orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Music or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This general course in music fundamentals includes basic theory, sight singing, piano keyboard, creative activity, and student demonstration. Through the understanding and application of the elements of music, students will be able to distinguish cultural styles and genres.
    Fundamentals of Music orView06 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Survey of Western Music or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This general cultural course is designed to develop an understanding and enjoyment of music. It includes a study of music in western civilization. In addition some world music topics will be addressed. Emphasis is upon class listening supplemented by historical background. Live concert attendance may be required.
    Survey of Western Music orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1241
    Course Title:Music Theory I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is the first of a four semester series of courses that study the theoretical and structural basis of music. Among the major topics covered in Music Theory I and Music Theory II are: notation, intervals, rhythm, scale patterns, melodic forms, harmonic conventions, four-part chorale structure, formal structure (binary, ternary). While this course is open to all, to be successful in this course, entering students must have a solid knowledge of note names, scale patterns and note rhythms such as that learned in MUSC 1200 Fundamentals of Music. This course is required for AFA music majors.
    Music Theory I orView06 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1242
    Course Title:Music Theory II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:A continuation of Music Theory I, this course is the second of a four-semester series of courses that study the theoretical and structural basis of music. Among the major topics covered in Music Theory I and Music Theory II are: notation, intervals, rhythm, scale patterns, melodic forms, harmonic conventions, four-part chorale structure, formal structure (binary, ternary). This course is required for AFA music majors.
    Music Theory II orView06 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1300
    Course Title:Music in World Cultures or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course teaches music primarily from non-Eurocentric cultures which may include but is not limited to Indian, Indonesian, Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern, African, Native American, and African American. Through their studies of the diversity of world music, students will develop a broader understanding and appreciation of other cultures.
    Music in World Cultures orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:Applied Music Guitar or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Applied Music Guitar orn/a1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1350
    Course Title:History of Rock 'n Roll or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course may include but is not limited to early American music, jazz, American musical theater, pop, rock, and rap. The history of popular music in Western Culture will be presented. Students will learn to identify the music styles contained under the broad umbrella of Rock 'n Roll. Students will also learn about the historical, social, cultural and political influences on popular music.
    History of Rock 'n Roll orView06 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1500
    Course Title:Class Guitar or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Class Guitar orn/a2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1501
    Course Title:Class Guitar I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is open to all students. It is designed for beginners or for guitar students wishing to fill in gaps in their knowledge from previous musical experience. It covers basic guitar techniques and musicianship skills used in a variety of different styles of music. Students will also study different types of written musical notation. It also introduces improvisation and song writing. Student must provide their own guitar (preferably acoustic) in good playing condition.
    Class Guitar I orView06 2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1502
    Course Title:Class Guitar II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is for the advanced beginning guitar student who has completed MUSC 1501, Class Guitar I, guitar students wanting to fill in gaps in their knowledge from previous musical experience, or wanting to continue their guitar studies in a classroom environment. To be successful in this class, the student should have completed MUSC 1501 Guitar Class I or be at the appropriate skill level. It covers guitar techniques and musicianship skills used in a variety of different styles of music. Students will also study different types of written musical notation, as well as improvisation and song writing. Student must provide their own guitar (preferably acoustic) in good playing condition.
    Class Guitar II orView06 2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1510
    Course Title:Applied Music: Guitar or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is open to all students and consists of private guitar instruction lessons of 1/2 hour per week (during fall and spring semesters). Students, beginners through advanced, can, in consultation instructor, pick areas of focus depending on their tastes and needs. These may include: guitar technique (i.e. chords, scales finger-picking) theory, reading, ear-training, analysis, improvisation, repertoire development and interpretation. This course may be repeated for credit. Special Music Fees apply. Student must provide their own guitar (preferably acoustic) in good playing condition.
    Applied Music: Guitar orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1560
    Course Title:Class Guitar or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Class Guitar orn/a1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1600
    Course Title:Class Voice or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is devoted to basic vocal techniques and skills. Students will learn different styles of song from various cultures and historical periods and will learn to evaluate the fundamentals of the creative process as expressed through vocal performance. This course is open to non-music majors.
    Class Voice orView06 2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1610
    Course Title:Applied Music: Voice or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is private voice instruction with lessons of one-half hour per week. Students will expand upon basic vocal technique and skills and will extend their technical ability and style interpretation skill through vocal repertoire from various cultures and historical periods. Students will extend their ability to interpret and create artistic expression through song. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply. MUSC 1600 Class Voice strongly recommended before taking this course."
    Applied Music: Voice orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1800
    Course Title:Class Piano or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Class Piano orn/a2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1801
    Course Title:Class Piano I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course offers basic piano instruction and technique for the student with no previous training in piano. Students will learn basic piano techniques and skills and be introduced to different playing styles. Students will be introduced to music and history of different cultures as related to the piano.
    Class Piano I orView06 2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1802
    Course Title:Class Piano II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:The purpose of the course is to build upon skills and musicianship begun in Class Piano I, allowing the student to continue gaining a better understanding of playing the piano and a greater appreciation of music in general. Both technique and musicianship will be addressed. Scales and/or exercises and music theory will be part of every class lesson. To be successful in this class, the student should have completed MUSC 1801 Class Piano I or be at the equivalent skill level.
    Class Piano II orView06 2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1810
    Course Title:Applied Music: Piano or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is private piano instruction with lessons of 1/2 hour per week (during fall and spring semesters). Students will expand upon basic piano technique and skills and will extend their technical ability and style interpretation skill through piano repertoire from various cultures and historical periods. Students will extend their ability to interpret and create artistic expression through piano literature and performance. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply.
    Applied Music: Piano orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1830
    Course Title:Applied Music: Strings or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is private instruction on a stringed instrument (violin, viola, cello, bass) lessons of 1/2 hour per week (during fall and spring semesters). Students will expand upon basic technique and skills, extending their technical ability and style interpretation through repertoire from various cultures and historical periods. Students will extend their ability to interpret their musical performance and create artistic expression through solo repertoire performed on the instrument. Student must provide their own instrument. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply.
    Applied Music: Strings orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1850
    Course Title:Applied Music: Percussion or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is private instruction on percussion instruments (e.g., drums, xylophone, marimba, or tympani) lessons of 1/2 hour per week (during fall and spring semesters). Students will expand upon their technique and skills, extending their technical ability and style interpretation through repertoire from various cultures and historical periods. Students will extend their ability to interpret their musical performance and create artistic expression through solo repertoire performed on the instrument. Student must provide their own instrument. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply.
    Applied Music: Percussion orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1860
    Course Title:Applied Music: Brass or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is private instruction on a brass instrument (e.g., trumpet, trombone, French horn, baritone, tuba) lessons of 1/2 hour per week (during fall and spring semesters). Students will expand upon their technique and skills, extending their technical ability and style interpretation through repertoire from various cultures and historical periods. Students will extend their ability to interpret their musical performance and create artistic expression through solo repertoire performed on the instrument. Student must provide their own instrument. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply.
    Applied Music: Brass orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1870
    Course Title:Applied Music: Woodwinds or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is private instruction on a woodwind instrument (saxophone, flute, clarinet, oboe or bassoon) lessons of 1/2 hour per week (during fall and spring semesters). Students will expand upon their technique and skills, extending their technical ability and style interpretation through repertoire from various cultures and historical periods. Students will extend their ability to interpret their musical performance and create artistic expression through solo repertoire performed on the instrument. Student must provide their own instrument. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply.
    Applied Music: Woodwinds orView06 1
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2010
    Course Title:Advanced Applied Music Lessons or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is private instruction for advanced students on their instrument (voice, piano, guitar, brass, woodwinds, strings, percussion) with lessons of one hour per week. Students will extend their ability to interpret their musical performance and create artistic expression through solo repertoire performed on their instrument. Students' advanced technical expertise will be incorporated into artistic expression and interpretation of repertoire that challenges their technique and demands artistic finesse and critical analysis. Student must provide their own instrument. This course may be repeated for credit. Special "Music Fees" apply. Admission to this course is by permission only. PLEASE CONTACT THE INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION TO REGISTER.
    Advanced Applied Music Lessons orView06 2
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2170
    Course Title:History of Music I: Medieval Through Classical Eras or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a historical survey primarily of music rooted in the European tradition. The timeframe of study will focus on eras referred to as the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods with some references to the roots of western music in ancient cultures. Music will be studied from the viewpoints of musical styles, genres, performance practices, as well as cultural and historical contexts of those eras.
    History of Music I: Medieval Through Classical Eras orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2180
    Course Title:History of Music II: Romantic Era to the 21st Century or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a historical survey primarily of music rooted in the European traditions. The timeframe of study will focus on eras referred to as the Romantic and late Romantic periods through the 20th century. Music will be studied from the viewpoints of musical styles, genres, performance practices, as well as cultural and historical contexts of those eras.
    History of Music II: Romantic Era to the 21st Century orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2241
    Course Title:Music Theory III or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:A continuation of Music Theory I & II, this course is the third of a four-semester series of courses that study the theoretical and structural basis of music. Among the major topics covered in Music Theory III and Music Theory IV are: Sixth, ninth, eleventh, thirteenth chords and their variants; counterpoint (two-voice), formal structures (fugue, sonata allegro, rondo, variation); pre-20th century tonality and 20th century atonality; music composition not based in tonal sound. This course is required for AFA music majors.
    Music Theory III orView06 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2242
    Course Title:Music Theory IV or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:A continuation of Music Theory III, this course is the final in four-semester series of courses that study the theoretical and structural basis of music. Among the major topics covered in Music Theory III and Music Theory IV are: Sixth, ninth, eleventh, thirteenth chords and their variants; counterpoint (two-voice), formal structures (fugue, sonata allegro, rondo, variation); pre-20th century tonality and 20th century atonality; music composition not based in tonal sound. This course is required for AFA music majors.
    Music Theory IV orView06 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2970
    Course Title:Music Appreciation Field Trip or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course consists of a series of concert or music experiences in the Twin Cities area or another cultural center, e.g. New York, Washington, D.C., to experience a variety of musical performances, lectures, demonstrations, and facilities. Students will study and experience the components that go into live music performances. In addition to live performances, students may tour architecture, museums and galleries to better analyze and understand the background against which the musical performances take place. Special fees may be applied. This course may be repeated for credit. Students will need to provide their own transportation to area concerts, museums or other venues.
    Music Appreciation Field Trip orView06 1
    PHIL1010Introduction to Philosophy or3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Ethics or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to both the methods and issues connected with thinking about morality and ethical systems. Moral skepticism will also be examined. The aim of this class is to allow students to be more aware of their own ethical modes of thinking and the diversity of ways morality enters into human lives.
    Ethics orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Eastern Religions or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:A study of Eastern religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism). The emphasis of the course is to develop knowledge of these belief systems and how they deal with philosophical and spiritual questions.
    Eastern Religions orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Western Religions or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of Western religions including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The emphasis of this course is to develop knowledge of these belief systems and how they deal with philosophical and spiritual questions.
    Western Religions orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:Philosophy of Religion or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will examine some of the basic questions in the field of philosophy of religion: Does God exist? Can God's existence or nonexistence be rationally proven? Can people be religious in light of the discoveries of science? What does it mean to be religious or nonreligious? Students will be encouraged to draw from their own experience and beliefs to critically think about the issues in this class.
    Philosophy of Religion orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Health Care Ethics or      Goal Areas:02,06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course looks at the underlying assumptions that affect beliefs, practices, and policies in contemporary health care. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of the ethical principles and theories related to health care. A wide variety of health care issues and the challenges they present will be studied. Critical thinking skills will be emphasized in determining the best course of action for making ethical decisions in the health care field.
    Health Care Ethics orView02,06,09 3
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Spanish and Latin American Culture or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the civilization and culture of Spain and Spanish America, with particular emphasis on comparative cultures, modern trends, the ancient Indian civilizations and African-Spanish-American influences. The course is taught in English; no previous knowledge of Spanish is required.
    Spanish and Latin American Culture orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:2201
    Course Title:Intermediate Spanish I or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course continues the development of the multiple language skills introduced in the beginning sequence. The student is introduced to the literature and culture of Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisite: Span 1102 or equivalent recommended
    Intermediate Spanish I orView06,08 5
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:2202
    Course Title:Intermediate Spanish II or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course continues the development of multiple language skills with the opportunity to improve reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension, with emphasis on developing skills in conversation and in expanding vocabulary. The student will also have a more extensive exposure to the literature and culture through readings and films. Prerequisite: Span 2201 or equivalent recommended
    Intermediate Spanish II orView06,08 5
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Theatre in the Twin Cities or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students attend performances of plays in order to understand the elements of theatrical and dramatic production. Students develop criteria for the evaluation of productions as they explore the complexities of theatre and its reflection of society. They also examine their own biases and value systems and how they affect their evaluation processes regarding artistic, societal, and personal points of view.
    Theatre in the Twin Cities orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Introduction to Theatre or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students become involved in a play's production while they explore the roots of the theater as a reflection of culture and community. Students investigate major theatrical historical periods and personalities, work on self-selected crews, analyze dramatic literature for meaning and production considerations, and may create and perform their own scenarios as a means of understanding the transformation of theater from page to stage.
    Introduction to Theatre orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1250
    Course Title:Introduction to Film or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the history and techniques of entertaining and communicating ideas through motion pictures. The course consists of viewing, analyzing, discussing and writing about films as a means of understanding visual communication and developing greater visual literacy.
    Introduction to Film orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1260
    Course Title:Introduction to Television or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to television's history, development, emerging technologies, influence, and future. It explores digital convergence as well as programming, distribution, regulation, and audience, constantly emphasizing the effect of money on this pervasive medium. Both television shows and movies about television will help illuminate the course content.
    Introduction to Television orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1270
    Course Title:Digital Video Production or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces basic video production concepts and techniques with an emphasis on using the elements of motion and sound as creative artistic tools. Students will critically analyze video in terms of genre, context, meaning, visual language and form and then produce and edit their own short projects that explore creative and experimental applications of the medium rather than the traditional mass communication form. Students are encouraged to use their own computer for editing if possible. Basic knowledge of the computer is helpful.
    Digital Video Production orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1280
    Course Title:Introduction to Screenwriting or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to screenwriting, dealing with the basics of drama, story, character, structure, dialogue, and meaning. It explores these elements with writing exercises that develop skills in plotting, exposition, suspense, and action. It focuses on visual storytelling, helping students to discover observable actions and images that can convey ideas effectively, while constantly emphasizing how well-developed characters' needs and wants drive the structure and conflict of an engaging story. It is intended to acquaint students with the craft of screenwriting; to be a beginning course in the field that will help prepare students for further work.
    Introduction to Screenwriting orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1290
    Course Title:Design for Theatre or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an examination of how theatre design (set, costume, properties, and lighting) are used to support the production of a play. The elements of design- line, texture, color, and form- are explored as they have been and are currently used by designers and directors for theatrical productions. Students analyze dramatic literature and create design projects.
    Design for Theatre orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:American Cinema or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:American Cinema is a class in which students look at American films that have played a role in American film history from its beginnings to the present. They explore America's filmmaking history and its contributions to American culture, specifically considering the many diverse communities portrayed in these films as well as filmmakers from these often minority communities. These selections include films by or about African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, Native Americans, GLBT Americans, and the contributions of American Women throughout film history. The course consists of viewing, analyzing, discussing and writing about American films as a means of understanding the impact of these works on our diverse American culture.
    American Cinema orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:World Cinema or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:World Cinema is a class in which students look at films from around the world. They explore various non-English-speaking countries' contributions to filmmaking and world culture that have been made by these countries' films. They look at two films from each country studied: one that exemplifies the historical/cultural concept that is associated with that country's films and one contemporary film from that country. The course consists of viewing, analyzing, discussing and writing about films from other cultures films as a means of understanding the impact of these works on our own as well as other cultures.
    World Cinema orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1350
    Course Title:The American Musical Theatre or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:American Musical Theatre is designed to enlighten the learner about the basics of musical theatre production and its genesis as a uniquely American art form. Also, the course will take a close look at the context in which these musicals were created and how they challenged society at that time. In addition, the course will examine the writing of the book, lyrics and music of many shows in an attempt to better analyze and evaluate the content.
    The American Musical Theatre orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1500
    Course Title:Acting I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course uses lectures, discussions, and interactive exercises to learn, demonstrate, and evaluate the principles of improvisation including basic stage awareness, non-verbal communication, self-awareness, and team work. Students will work in ensemble to understand, evaluate, and use the concepts of objective, intention, and motivation. Written analyses as well as presentations may be used to demonstrate understanding of these skills and concepts.
    Acting I orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1510
    Course Title:Movement and Voice or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will learn and incorporate a movement vocabulary and relaxed vocal projection through a series of group projects throughout the semester. Emphasis is placed on utilization of learned techniques to create character, heightened response to others on stage and to enhance stage presence.
    Movement and Voice orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1520
    Course Title:Acting II: Building Characters or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students select plays and their characters to research, analyze, evaluate, write about, and present or demonstrate character analysis, posture, movement, non-verbal communication, vocal variety, projection, and personal experience and awareness. Students are encouraged to take TFT 1500 (Acting 1: Improvisations and Foundations) before taking this class.
    Acting II: Building Characters orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1531
    Course Title:Stage Combat I or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Stage Combat I is an introductory course in the Stage Combat Program, and will focus on unarmed (hand to hand fighting) and armed (found objects, knives, etc.) stage combat. The program conforms to the guidelines put forth by the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD). Telling a story effectively through the use of disciplined and safe stage combat will be stressed, as well as instruction in the history, type and use of various weapons. Students in the performing arts will gain self-confidence in their ability to fulfill the needs of any script calling for stage or screen violence. Students not in the performing arts will gain a firsthand appreciation of the skills necessary to make stage and screen violence look real.
    Stage Combat I orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1532
    Course Title:Stage Combat II or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Stage Combat II is the follow-up course to Stage Combat I in the Stage Combat Program. The primary focus of this course will be on performance. The skills learned in Stage Combat I will be reviewed and refined, then applied to the performance of choreographed staged fights within the context of a scene. Students will assign emotional value to the physical circumstances of the scene and act out the intentions of the character. This program conforms to the guidelines put forth by the Society of American Fight Directors (SAFD), which contains 90 hours of required instruction. Students in the performing arts will gain self-confidence in their ability to fulfill the needs of any script calling for stage or screen violence. Students not in the performing arts will gain a firsthand appreciation of the skills necessary to make stage and screen violence look real.
    Stage Combat II orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1540
    Course Title:Acting for the Camera or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will have the opportunity to perform in front of the camera and see themselves as the camera records them, revealing their strengths and challenges. Acting techniques specific to working in film and television will be covered along with methods for auditioning, script analysis, character development, communication and style. How to handle camera and editing equipment is also included.
    Acting for the Camera orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1600
    Course Title:Theatre Practicum: Performance or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:In this class, students choose a particular area of practicum study such as acting, directing, assisting a director, working on a technical crew assignment, or another major responsibility. Students research, analyze and participate in some aspect of a North Hennepin production. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Theatre Practicum: Performance orView06 1
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1610
    Course Title:Theatre Practicum: Technical or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:In this class, students choose a particular area of practicum study such as directing, assisting a director, working on a technical crew assignment, or another major responsibility. Students research, analyze and participate in some aspect of a North Hennepin production. This course may be repeated for credit. Consent of Instructor required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
    Theatre Practicum: Technical orView06 1
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:2010
    Course Title:Fundamentals of Directing or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Fundamentals of Directing is open to any student who is interested in learning the basic skills necessary to become adept at directing. The student will learn about the wide variety of responsibilities a director assumes, as well as the range of knowledge every director needs to possess in order to communicate a story effectively on stage or screen. The course will cover the function of the director, script analysis, groundplan and blocking, working with the actor, creating a unified whole, and working collaboratively with a production team. In addition, the course will cover some of the similarities and differences between directing for the stage, film, and television. For students in careers outside the performing arts, this course offers opportunities to gain a deeper appreciation of the process of directing, increase personal self-confidence, and improve communication skills in a team setting. Pre-requisites: TFT 1500 or TFT 1540 or TFT 1210 or TFT 1250 or instructor permission.
    Fundamentals of Directing orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:2500
    Course Title:Playwrighting or      Goal Areas:06       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of writing theatrical plays. They will be expected to work on several creative projects throughout the semester and to participate in workshops in which they will discuss and critique one another's work. Students may also be asked to complete other writing exercises and to analyze a selection of plays to gain a better understanding of the art of play wrighting. Prerequisites: Engl 1900
    Playwrighting orView06 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:2950
    Course Title:Theatre Appreciation Field Trip      Goal Areas:06       Credits:1

    Course Description:This class gives students an opportunity to attend theatre productions and explore back-stage theatre operations. Students will learn the components of dramatic production and establish a basis for evaluation of a production. May be repeated for credit.
    Theatre Appreciation Field TripView06 1
     
    Goal Area 7: Human Diversity
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Human Diversity - 1 course
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Women in American Society I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Women in American Society I orn/a3
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Women in American Society II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Women in American Society II orn/a3
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:2210
    Course Title:American Studies Topics I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Studies Topics I orn/a3
    Course Subject: AMST         Course Number:2220
    Course Title:American Studies Topics II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Studies Topics II orn/a3
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:Anthropology of Religion or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course involves the study and comparison of religious institutions from a wide variety of cultures. We will consider the wonderful array of beliefs and practices of humanity. We will consider religion, magic, and witchcraft, and how these cultural constructions shed light on the societies in which they were created. Through seminar-style discussions of a variety of essays on religion and some videos, students will engage with the material on a deeper level than they normally would in a lecture format. Throughout the course, students will learn about the development of a wide variety of religious group identities, and their changing meanings across a wide range of cultures, and periods of history. They will learn about the dynamics of social stratification that religious groups experience today. Students will study the diversity of religion, and the racism and bigotry that often plagues peoples ideas and behavior towards other religious groups. This material will bring to light the institutional exclusion and discrimination that certain groups have endured. This course involves the study and comparison of religious institutions from a wide variety of cultures. We will consider the wonderful array of beliefs and practices of humanity. We will consider religion, magic, and witchcraft, and how these cultural constructions shed light on the societies in which they were created. Through seminar-style discussions of a variety of essays on religion and some videos, students will engage with the material on a deeper level than they normally would in a lecture format. Throughout the course, students will learn about the development of a wide variety of religious group identities, and their changing meanings across a wide range of cultures, and periods of history. They will learn about the dynamics of social stratification that religious groups experience today. Students will study the diversity of religion, and the racism and bigotry that often plagues peoples ideas and behavior towards other religious groups. This material will bring to light the institutional exclusion and discrimination that certain groups have endured. Through the consideration and discussion of numerous religious groups of America and beyond, students will learn the role(s) that these groups have played in our culture, and contributions they have made. Through presenting their two research projects to the class, students will exercise communication skills that involve great tact in discussing religious practices in a neutral and objective manner. We will practice those skills every class, in our seminar discussions of the reading. These discussions will get directly at the disparate explanatory systems offered by world religions, compare them, and critique the various views. In these ways, students will be using the method and data that anthropologists employ in the investigation of religion.
    Anthropology of Religion orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: ASL         Course Number:1300
    Course Title:Deaf Culture or      Goal Areas:07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This class provides students with an understanding of the History and Culture of Deaf People. Students will learn about Deaf and Hard of hearing people in the Deaf Community in all areas of the United States and how the culture has progressed since the 1800's.
    Deaf Culture orView07 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Principles of Interpersonal Communication or      Goal Areas:01,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course looks at communication in one-to-one relationships in friendships, families, the workplace, and elsewhere. Students will be challenged to discover and assess their own communication strengths and weaknesses as they define and discuss what it means to be a competent interpersonal communicator. Course content includes both theory and practice (skill development).
    Principles of Interpersonal Communication orView01,07 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:Intercultural Communication or      Goal Areas:07,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:The influence of culture is an especially important and sensitive issue facing us today. A person's culture strongly influences his/her identity, beliefs, expectations, and communication style. This course explores communication across culture as defined by nationality, gender, and ethnicity while concentrating on effective use of communication in all of these areas.
    Intercultural Communication orView07,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:1450
    Course Title:Reading Plays or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a survey of drama as literature; plays will be read as literary texts, not as the grounds for specific performances or performance practices. Through their engagements with the dramatic literature in this course, students will be introduced to a diversity of dramatic styles and themes. Attention will also be devoted to the social and cultural contexts in which the plays were written and in which they are read. Course materials may be organized either historically or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Reading Plays orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Children's Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:In this course, students will have the pleasure of reading, discussing and evaluating childrens literature ranging from the picture book to the young adult novel. Students will explore the history of childrens literature, critical responses to it and its specific role for children and adults. Students will examine works from the genre that might include picture books, chapter books, folktales, fantasy, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry and nonfiction with an emphasis on how the genre and its themes have evolved over time, paying particular attention to how those themes address the role of children in society. This course will appeal to students, parents and educators. Prerequisite: Assessment score placement in Adev 0951 or above, ENGL 0950 or above, or ESOL 1230 or above. Recommendation: Completion of ENGL 1201 with a grade of "C" or higher.
    Children's Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2320
    Course Title:Writing: From Structure to Style or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the structure of language as well how its rules and applications affect written communication and authorial choices in professional and academic settings. The course further intends to create confidence in written and oral expression, to support students in business, graphic arts, paralegal, and other programs. Prerequisite: Engl 1201
    Writing: From Structure to Style orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2330
    Course Title:Hmong American Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Hmong American Literature explores the works of Hmong writers as represented in the novel, nonfiction, short stories, poetry, drama/film, and Paj Ntaub (stories recorded in tapestry). To a more limited extent, characterizations of Hmong in works by non-Hmong authors may be considered, as well as relevant works by Laotian American and Asian American writers.
    Hmong American Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Women and Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course explores women as characters in and writers of literature, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. The course may also address issues of historical context, gender, class and race as a way of understanding women in literature.
    Women and Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2370
    Course Title:African American Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the student to the writings of African-Americans from the colonial period to the present and explores the contributions of these writers to American culture, letters, and life. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically.
    African American Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2380
    Course Title:American Indian Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the students to North American Native American Literature. Readings may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, songs, mythology, and film from traditional and contemporary authors. Special attention may be given to Native American authors with Minnesota connections, such as Louise Erdrich, David Treuer, and Susan Power.
    American Indian Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2450
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary developments (e.g. sentimentalism, gothic fiction, romanticism, transcendentalism) and key historical and social contexts, from the pre-colonial period to 1860. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature I orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2460
    Course Title:Survey of American Literature II or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary movements (e.g. local color, realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism) and social and historical contexts, from 1860 to the present. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Survey of American Literature II orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2900
    Course Title:Fantasy Literature or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to fantasy as a literary genre. It will expose students to various types of fantasy stories (such as high fantasy, sword and sorcery, urban fantasy, and/or fantasy horror). It will also address how fantasy literature can reflect or comment on issues in the real world, including how various forms of bigotry can be challenged or normalized by fantasy texts.
    Fantasy Literature orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota or      Goal Areas:07,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This American Indian cultural course will provide students with an overview, past and present, of the cultures of Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota, including music, dance, art, the oral story telling tradition and the American Indian connection with the environment and other non-human species. Students will also analyze how these vibrant cultures have survived oppression and genocide, and continue to thrive. Through exploring this living culture, students will gain understanding of Indigenous Peoples strong connection with, and stewardship of, the environment, learn about an important aspect of human and global diversity, and our interconnectedness with each other and our environment.
    American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota orView07,10 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Practical Applications of Traditional Aikido or      Goal Areas:07,09       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course uses Traditional Aikido (a Japanese martial art) in order to help the student gain skills both on and off the mat, applying them to his or her profession and daily life. The student will research, study, and practice real-life scenarios and situations of de-escalation, protection, compliance, and restraint- maximizing safety, focus, awareness, and control. Aikido is a life-giving tool. This class appeals to the beginner and experienced Aikido student. It is ideal for Criminal Justice, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Military, and Security jobs as well as other service professions. *Note: This course is an elective course in Global and Cultural Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 7 & 8. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    Practical Applications of Traditional Aikido orView07,09 2
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:Community Organizing I or      Goal Areas:07,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:The focus of this course will be developing leadership skills through community organizing and empowering students to make lasting changes at the college, in their own communities and the world. Students will examine past and present social movements with a special focus on organizing in communities of color. This course will also explore the contemporary meanings of community in the United States. Students will learn to identify the leader within by examining the relationship between community and citizenship. This course will also focus on issues of diversity and sustainable communities with the practical application of active leadership techniques and creative organizing on our campus. This could include aspects of the annual Earth Week Program such as Marketing, PR, Event Planning, Budgeting, Community Partnerships, Cross Campus and Cross cultural collaborations, and curriculum integration.
    Community Organizing I orView07,09 3
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Geography of the United States or      Goal Areas:07       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course provides a broad overview of those factors, cultural and physical, that identify the United States. Topics covered include climate, topography, population, language, history and regionalism. Students will gain an introductory knowledge of United States history, economics, politics, physical landscapes and culture. This course is recommended for international students or those new to the United States.
    Geography of the United States orView07 2
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Human Geography or      Goal Areas:07,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course surveys occupancy and use of the earth. The great diversity of this human experience as well as the nature of the people/land relationship are examined in terms of distinctive culture realms which have manifested varying degrees of technological and sociological development in time and space. Essential to this examination is a comparative review of the contemporary geographies of race, language, religion, political ideologies, economic activity, settlement, and population.
    Human Geography orView07,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:History of United States Through 1877 or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the major cultural, social, and political issues in United States history from the revolutionary period through Reconstruction. We look at the ideas that led to the revolution, how the thirteen colonies assembled themselves into a republic, the consequences of slave culture to the course of American history, and the promises and failures of Reconstruction. The student will come to understand the multiple and inter-related forces relevant to the early years of the republic.
    History of United States Through 1877 orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:History of the United States Since 1877 or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course focuses on the major social and cultural issues in United This course focuses on the major cultural, social and political issues in United States history from the late nineteenth century Gilded Age through the end of the twentieth century. We look at the influence of the industrial revolution, the impact of increasing levels of European and Asian immigration, the rise of organized labor, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the impact of United States foreign policy, and countercultural movements. The student will gain insight into the aspects that are most crucial for a solid understanding of the nation's history.
    History of the United States Since 1877 orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:American Colonial History or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Colonial History orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1240
    Course Title:History of the American West or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    History of the American West orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1270
    Course Title:Race in America or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course investigates the role played by race in the shaping of United States history. We examine the concept of race and the historical relationships in America between those of African, Asian, European, and Native descents. We will examine Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Movement and current racial issues. The goal is to broaden student understanding of United States history by a focused study of its multi-faceted racial relationships throughout the centuries.
    Race in America orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota orn/a3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Western Religions or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of Western religions including Judaism, Christianity and Islam. The emphasis of this course is to develop knowledge of these belief systems and how they deal with philosophical and spiritual questions.
    Western Religions orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1165
    Course Title:Psychology of Adjustment or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an in-depth look at the processes of normal human adjustment and their application in the student's life adjustment. A component of the course is diversity and dealing with diversity, specifically the development and changing group identities in the U. S.; an examination of the individual and institutional processes of unequal power between groups; an examination of the students' attitudes, behavior and beliefs about diversity, stereotyping, prejudice, bias and racism and bigotry; and experience in developing the necessary communication skills for living and working in a diverse society. Other topics may include goal setting and change processes, self-awareness and identity, physical and psychological health, stress and coping, interpersonal relationships and communication, emotions and motivation, social interactions, psychological growth and development, meaning and values, and decision making.
    Psychology of Adjustment orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:1170
    Course Title:Psychology of Gender or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Psychology of Gender includes the theory and research relating to sexuality, gender roles and sexual orientation.
    Psychology of Gender orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2110
    Course Title:Principles of Social Psychology or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course analyzes how individual's thoughts, feelings and actions are influenced by others. Topics include perception, attraction, altruism, aggression, attitudes, leadership, conformity and obedience, stereotyping and prejudice, persuasion and propaganda and the self-concept. Prerequisite: Soc 1110 or Psyc 1160 or Permission from Instructor
    Principles of Social Psychology orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2340
    Course Title:Human Sexuality or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:An overview of past and current research on human sexuality. The course will address: the human sexual response; models and sources of arousal; cultural influences on human sexual behavior and sexual diversity; emotional aspects of sexuality and sexual dysfunction; sexual communication, intimacy, dependency and jealousy; sexual exploration and courting behavior across the life span; atypical behavior, commercialized sex, and sexual coercion. Prerequisite: Psyc 1150
    Human Sexuality orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Introduction to Sociology or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a study of social and cultural aspects of human behavior. Topics include society and culture, roles and norms, groups and organizations, deviance, inequality, social and cultural change, and research methods.
    Introduction to Sociology orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Social Problems/Deviance or      Goal Areas:07,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines issues and concerns in the modern world such as population, global warming, the environment, natural resources, terrorism, poverty, racism, sexism, mental illness, drug abuse, crime, sexual assault, prostitution and suicide. Social policies designed to deal with those issues are also considered. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Social Problems/Deviance orView07,09 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2110
    Course Title:Principles of Social Psychology or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course analyzes how individual's thoughts, feelings and actions are influenced by others. Topics include perception, attraction, altruism, aggression, attitudes, leadership, conformity and obedience, persuasion and propaganda and the self-concept. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Principles of Social Psychology orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2210
    Course Title:Social Inequality or      Goal Areas:05,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course considers the social history, current conditions, and future prospects of minority groups in the United States. Topics include racism, sexism, prejudice, discrimination, affirmative action, and other related issues and social policies. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Social Inequality orView05,07 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Introduction to Theatre or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students become involved in a play's production while they explore the roots of the theater as a reflection of culture and community. Students investigate major theatrical historical periods and personalities, work on self-selected crews, analyze dramatic literature for meaning and production considerations, and may create and perform their own scenarios as a means of understanding the transformation of theater from page to stage.
    Introduction to Theatre orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:American Cinema or      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:American Cinema is a class in which students look at American films that have played a role in American film history from its beginnings to the present. They explore America's filmmaking history and its contributions to American culture, specifically considering the many diverse communities portrayed in these films as well as filmmakers from these often minority communities. These selections include films by or about African Americans, Asian Americans, Latino Americans, Native Americans, GLBT Americans, and the contributions of American Women throughout film history. The course consists of viewing, analyzing, discussing and writing about American films as a means of understanding the impact of these works on our diverse American culture.
    American Cinema orView06,07 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1350
    Course Title:The American Musical Theatre      Goal Areas:06,07       Credits:3

    Course Description:American Musical Theatre is designed to enlighten the learner about the basics of musical theatre production and its genesis as a uniquely American art form. Also, the course will take a close look at the context in which these musicals were created and how they challenged society at that time. In addition, the course will examine the writing of the book, lyrics and music of many shows in an attempt to better analyze and evaluate the content.
    The American Musical TheatreView06,07 3
     
    Goal Area 8: Global Perspective
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Global Perspective - 1 course
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the nature of culture by studying the forms of conventional behavior (language, ideology, social organization, and technology) and their material manifestations. It also seeks to explain the variation in cultures of representative ethnic groups and societies of present and recent past in terms of ecological adaptation and cultural evolution.
    Introduction to Anthropology: Cultural Anthropology orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: ARBC         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Arab Cultures or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course discusses the history and culture of the Arab world, examining various aspects of this rich and venerable civilization, the importance attached to education, the achievements of Arab science and also the internal conflicts, wide-spread poverty, and the role of women. This course is also an introduction to how the religion of Islam created a far-flung Arab Muslim world that embraces lands reaching from the shores of the Atlantic to the Indian Ocean, and examines how social institutions and culture are intertwined with politics and economics. This course is taught in English; no previous knowledge of Arabic language is required.
    Arab Cultures orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ARBC         Course Number:1101
    Course Title:Introduction to Arabic or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:Designed for the student with little or no previous experience with a second language, this course gives students the opportunity to learn basic communication needs in Arabic. The four language skills of reading, listening, writing, and speaking will be implemented and practiced. The class begins with learning the Alphabet and progresses into learning reading elementary level Arabic, writing simple sentences, speaking basic and introductory idioms. Listening drills and exercises are employed in the class. Students will also learn basic grammar and its applicability, especially in writing. The course also introduces students to the culture of the Arabic-speaking people. Some aspects of Arab heritage, traditions, and customs will be highlighted and explained.
    Introduction to Arabic orView08 4
    Course Subject: ARBC         Course Number:1102
    Course Title:Beginning Arabic II or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is the second of two-course series to fulfill the needs of our students as well as our community. It is designed for non-native beginners to learn formal Arabic also known as Modern Standard Arabic. Prerequisite: Arbc 1101
    Beginning Arabic II orView08 4
    Course Subject: ARBC         Course Number:2201
    Course Title:Intermediate Arabic I or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course continues the development of the multiple language skills introduced in the beginning sequence. The student is introduced to the literature and culture of Arabic speaking nations. Prerequisite: Arbc 1102 or equivalent
    Intermediate Arabic I orView08 4
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Introduction to Art or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course introduces the basic concepts of the visual arts, the organization of art forms, and the historical development of architecture, painting, and sculpture with an emphasis on contemporary art. A general world view of art is presented through lecture and discussion. Students will investigate the creative aspects of the visual arts through in-class examples and a field trip to a Twin Cities museum.
    Introduction to Art orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2180
    Course Title:Art History: Pre-History to the Age of Cathedrals or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines painting, sculpture and architecture of cultures from prehistory to the end of the 15th Century. While the emphasis is on developments in Western art, the course includes overviews of the arts of Asia, Africa and the Americas. Museum visits support the lectures and text.
    Art History: Pre-History to the Age of Cathedrals orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2190
    Course Title:Art History: Renaissance to 21st Century Art or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines painting, sculpture and architecture of cultures from the 16th century to the present, as well as new media of the modern era. While the emphasis is on developments in Europe and the United States, the course will include overviews of the arts of Asia, Africa and the Americas. Museum visits support the lectures and text.
    Art History: Renaissance to 21st Century Art orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ART         Course Number:2300
    Course Title:Architectural History or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course is a survey of the history of Western architecture from pre-history to the present day. The student will gain knowledge and understandings of the characteristics of the architecture of Western cultures, the ideas and intentions which motivated builders, as well as terminology related to architectural design and construction.
    Architectural History orView06,08 2
    Course Subject: ASL         Course Number:1101
    Course Title:American Sign Language I or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course teaches the basics for communication with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing individuals. The course includes receptive and expressive finger-spelling, signing, conversational behaviors, and various aspects of Deaf Culture.
    American Sign Language I orView08 4
    Course Subject: ASL         Course Number:1102
    Course Title:American Sign Language II or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a continuation of ASL 1101. The student's signing and finger-spelling will be increased to improve their signing skills. Prerequisite: ASL 1101
    American Sign Language II orView08 4
    Course Subject: ASL         Course Number:2201
    Course Title:Intermediate American Sign Language I or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course gives students an opportunity to practice their signing skills while increasing their knowledge of various vocabularies, using appropriate body language and facial expression. The course also will prepare students to read signers and will introduce more complex ASL structures. Prerequisite: ASL 1102
    Intermediate American Sign Language I orView08 4
    Course Subject: ASL         Course Number:2202
    Course Title:Intermediate American Sign Language II or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course gives students an opportunity to increase their listening and signing skills in depth. Students will meet Deaf people in a field trip setting to expose them to the Deaf world. Students may do observations with Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing people approximately three times. Prerequisite: ASL 2201
    Intermediate American Sign Language II orView08 4
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1310
    Course Title:Intercultural Communication or      Goal Areas:07,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:The influence of culture is an especially important and sensitive issue facing us today. A person's culture strongly influences his/her identity, beliefs, expectations, and communication style. This course explores communication across culture as defined by nationality, gender, and ethnicity while concentrating on effective use of communication in all of these areas.
    Intercultural Communication orView07,08 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1510
    Course Title:Nonverbal Communication or      Goal Areas:01,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Nonverbal Communication is an essential component of all communication. This introductory course is intended to increase communication effectiveness in a variety of contexts, including interpersonal, intercultural, and workplace. Students will understand, assess, and practice their own nonverbal codes and cues as well as study others' nonverbal codes and cues.
    Nonverbal Communication orView01,08 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1710
    Course Title:Oral Interpretation and Traditions or      Goal Areas:01,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Oral Interpretation and Traditions is an introductory course in the effective oral presentation of written material. Students will analyze and perform literature from a variety of sources that represent different cultures and ethnicities. Students will also make connections between the cultural implications of oral tradition and performance.
    Oral Interpretation and Traditions orView01,08 3
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:Principles of Macroeconomics or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers mainstream theories, the economy's recent performance, national income and output levels, money and the banking system, inflation and unemployment, fiscal and monetary policies, economic growth, and international trade.
    Principles of Macroeconomics orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2360
    Course Title:Global Literary Perspectives or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Students will interpret world literature and film (either in translation or originally written in English) that present culturally diverse voices and viewpoints. Special attention will be given to colonial and postcolonial literatures that reflect the immigrant communities of Twin Cities college campuses, such as Egyptian, Finnish, Ethiopian, Hmong, Icelandic, Iranian, Korean, Liberian, Mexican, Norwegian, Russian, Somali, Swedish, and Vietnamese. Prerequisite: Placement into Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Global Literary Perspectives orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2550
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature I or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from its beginnings to 1785. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and Swift, among others, are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended.
    Survey of British Literature I orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2560
    Course Title:Survey of British Literature II or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from 1785 through the 20th century. The literature of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended
    Survey of British Literature II orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2580
    Course Title:Shakespeare's Plays or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:A study of the major plays of William Shakespeare that may include a close reading of the plays, consideration of acting methods, and evaluation of cinematic and theatrical presentations. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Shakespeare's Plays orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2590
    Course Title:Shakespeare Plays II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Shakespeare Plays II orn/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido orn/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1211
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I or      Goal Areas:08,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:Join in an interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. Realize how Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and technique can be integrated into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build health, respect and responsibility through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I orView08,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1212
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II or      Goal Areas:08,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a continuation of the interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. It will include further study of Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and the next level of techniques, integrating what is learned into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build health, respect and responsibility through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II orView08,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1213
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido III or      Goal Areas:08,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a continuation of the interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. It will include further study of Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and the next level of technique, integrating what is learned into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build sincere people through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido III orView08,09 3
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Human Geography or      Goal Areas:07,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course surveys occupancy and use of the earth. The great diversity of this human experience as well as the nature of the people/land relationship are examined in terms of distinctive culture realms which have manifested varying degrees of technological and sociological development in time and space. Essential to this examination is a comparative review of the contemporary geographies of race, language, religion, political ideologies, economic activity, settlement, and population.
    Human Geography orView07,08 3
    GEOG1100World Geography or3
    GEOG1190Area Studies or3
    Course Subject: GERM         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Culture of the German-Speaking Countries or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Culture of the German-Speaking Countries orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:World History: Origins to 1300 or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines world history from its origins to end of the 13th century. Although it is important for students of world history to have a nuanced understanding of cultures, states, and other entities that constitute the fabric of human history, the primary focus of the world historian is the study of phenomena that transcends single states, regions, or cultures. In other words, world history is not the study of the histories of discrete cultures and states one after another and in isolation from one another: world history is transregional, transnational, and transcultural. As long as one focuses on the big picture of cultural interchange and/or comparative history, one is a practicing world historian.
    World History: Origins to 1300 orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:World History: 1300 to Present or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines world history from the 14th century to the present. Although it is important for students of world history to have a nuanced understanding of cultures, states, and other entities that constitute the fabric of human history, the primary focus of the world historian is the study of phenomena that transcends single states, regions, or cultures. In other words, world history is not the study of the histories of discrete cultures and states one after another and in isolation from one another: world history is transregional, transnational, and transcultural. As long as one focuses on the big picture of cultural interchange and/or comparative history, one is a practicing world historian.
    World History: 1300 to Present orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Colonial History of the Americas or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the human migratory phase that led to the initial peopling of the Americas beginning ca. 35,000 BCE; it explores the first colonial period that began ca. 7500 BCE with the rise of domesticated agriculture and the consequent establishment of major civilizations in South America, Meso-America, and North America; and it covers the second colonial period initiated by the arrival of the Spanish in 1492 and that began drawing to a conclusion in the late eighteenth century. Study of the second colonial period includes the colonization of North America, Central America, The Caribbean, and South America by six European empires: the Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, Russian, and English.
    Colonial History of the Americas orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:History of Western Civilization Pre 1550 or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the development of Western Civilization from ancient origins through the Reformation. We will consider various "western" civilizations ranging from ancient Mesopotamian civilizations to Early Modern Europe, following a chronological progression, while maintaining a broad geographic scope. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the different Western civilizations and the periods in which they flourished, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence.
    History of Western Civilization Pre 1550 orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:History of Western Civilization 1550 to Present or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. The course will focus on social, political, and cultural developments in Europe, covering topics such as the Industrial Revolution and Globalization in the 20th century. The course will also examine how these developments affected the rest of the world. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.
    History of Western Civilization 1550 to Present orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:History of the Medieval West or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the development of the three major Western cultures that emerged during the Middle Ages: Western Europe, Byzantium, and Islam. Specific emphasis will be given to the interactions between these three cultures, both positive and negative. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.
    History of the Medieval West orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:History of the Ancient West or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the origins and development of civilizations surrounding the Mediterranean, such as the Egyptians, Hittites, Greeks, and Romans, during the ancient period, from about 3000 BC through about AD 300. The course will explore the contact between the various ancient civilizations, and will seek to understand both the tendency toward empire-creation in the ancient world, and the proclivity of those empires to collapse. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.
    History of the Ancient West orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:2500
    Course Title:World Regional History or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Each semester this course is devoted to the history of a specific world region, and the region will change from semester to semester. The goal is to provide the student with the opportunity for an in-depth study of specific societies and specific cultures from around the world. The course may be repeated for credit under a different subtitle as the subject matter changes.
    World Regional History orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: HUM         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Eastern Religions or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Eastern Religions orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1211
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1212
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II orn/a3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Survey of Western Music or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This general cultural course is designed to develop an understanding and enjoyment of music. It includes a study of music in western civilization. In addition some world music topics will be addressed. Emphasis is upon class listening supplemented by historical background. Live concert attendance may be required.
    Survey of Western Music orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:1300
    Course Title:Music in World Cultures or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course teaches music primarily from non-Eurocentric cultures which may include but is not limited to Indian, Indonesian, Chinese, Japanese, Middle Eastern, African, Native American, and African American. Through their studies of the diversity of world music, students will develop a broader understanding and appreciation of other cultures.
    Music in World Cultures orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2170
    Course Title:History of Music I: Medieval Through Classical Eras or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a historical survey primarily of music rooted in the European tradition. The timeframe of study will focus on eras referred to as the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods with some references to the roots of western music in ancient cultures. Music will be studied from the viewpoints of musical styles, genres, performance practices, as well as cultural and historical contexts of those eras.
    History of Music I: Medieval Through Classical Eras orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: MUSC         Course Number:2180
    Course Title:History of Music II: Romantic Era to the 21st Century or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a historical survey primarily of music rooted in the European traditions. The timeframe of study will focus on eras referred to as the Romantic and late Romantic periods through the 20th century. Music will be studied from the viewpoints of musical styles, genres, performance practices, as well as cultural and historical contexts of those eras.
    History of Music II: Romantic Era to the 21st Century orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Introduction to Philosophy or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to philosophical inquiry and major problems philosophers think about (including the nature of existence and the difficulty of saying whether any knowledge is certain). Students will be encouraged to question their basic beliefs and recognize their philosophical assumptions. No definite conclusions will be reached.
    Introduction to Philosophy orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Eastern Religions or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:A study of Eastern religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism). The emphasis of the course is to develop knowledge of these belief systems and how they deal with philosophical and spiritual questions.
    Eastern Religions orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1060
    Course Title:Philosophy of Religion or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will examine some of the basic questions in the field of philosophy of religion: Does God exist? Can God's existence or nonexistence be rationally proven? Can people be religious in light of the discoveries of science? What does it mean to be religious or nonreligious? Students will be encouraged to draw from their own experience and beliefs to critically think about the issues in this class.
    Philosophy of Religion orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Political Philosophy or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:In this course we will examine issues in political philosophy through discussion of a range of primary western and non-western historical texts from ancient, medieval, and modern political writers. In the process of this examination of the historical development of political philosophy, a variety of topics will be explored such as: diverse theories of human nature and their implications for the role of government, the dynamics of power, the ideals of duty, justice, liberty and equality, and justifications for private property, profit, and civil disobedience.
    Political Philosophy orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Global Justice, Peace and Conflict or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course acquaints the student with the major philosophical and ethical dilemmas arising from conflicts within and between societies, with an effort to promote critical awareness and communication around peace and global justice. From a range of philosophical perspectives, students will consider global conflicts, such as those arising from war, nationalism, immigration, environmental crises, discrimination, terrorism, and global poverty. Students will seek to understand such concepts as justice, tolerance, self-determination, equality, fairness, and governance, in an effort to draw conclusions about causes of and solutions to global crises. Students will consider personal and societal strategies for conflict resolution and nonviolent change.
    Global Justice, Peace and Conflict orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1600
    Course Title:Comparative Politics or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines and compares the organization and politics of modern governments around the world. Countries studied exemplify larger course themes of political institutions, political culture, elections, public policy, democratization, economic development, and comparative methodology.
    Comparative Politics orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1700
    Course Title:World Politics or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a general introduction to international relations with emphasis on great power politics, international organizations, security studies, international political economy, and global environmental politics.
    World Politics orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: PSYC         Course Number:2350
    Course Title:Multicultural Psychology or      Goal Areas:05,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to diversity and multiculturalism within psychology. Students will have a broad understanding of extant research on diversity from a wide variety of perspectives including international perspectives. Topics covered include: culture and identity, group behavior, stereotyping and prejudice, cross-cultural research, and international research. COMM 1310 is highly recommended before taking this course. Prerequisite: Psyc 1150 or Psyc 1160 or consent of instructor
    Multicultural Psychology orView05,08 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:2410
    Course Title:Women in Global Perspectives or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Women in Global Perspectives orn/a3
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Spanish and Latin American Culture or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to the civilization and culture of Spain and Spanish America, with particular emphasis on comparative cultures, modern trends, the ancient Indian civilizations and African-Spanish-American influences. The course is taught in English; no previous knowledge of Spanish is required.
    Spanish and Latin American Culture orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:1101
    Course Title:Beginning Spanish I or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:5

    Course Description:Designed for the student with little or no previous experience with languages, this course stresses correct pronunciation, aural comprehension, basic structure, and a practical reading knowledge of Spanish.
    Beginning Spanish I orView08 5
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:1102
    Course Title:Beginning Spanish II or      Goal Areas:08       Credits:5

    Course Description:Continuing the activities and skill development from Span 1101, this course will emphasize basic proficiency reinforcing the student's knowledge and awareness of appropriate language use in a variety of situations. Prerequisite: Span 1101 or equivalent recommended
    Beginning Spanish II orView08 5
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:2201
    Course Title:Intermediate Spanish I or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course continues the development of the multiple language skills introduced in the beginning sequence. The student is introduced to the literature and culture of Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisite: Span 1102 or equivalent recommended
    Intermediate Spanish I orView06,08 5
    Course Subject: SPAN         Course Number:2202
    Course Title:Intermediate Spanish II or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:5

    Course Description:This course continues the development of multiple language skills with the opportunity to improve reading, writing, speaking and listening comprehension, with emphasis on developing skills in conversation and in expanding vocabulary. The student will also have a more extensive exposure to the literature and culture through readings and films. Prerequisite: Span 2201 or equivalent recommended
    Intermediate Spanish II orView06,08 5
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1260
    Course Title:Introduction to Television or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to television's history, development, emerging technologies, influence, and future. It explores digital convergence as well as programming, distribution, regulation, and audience, constantly emphasizing the effect of money on this pervasive medium. Both television shows and movies about television will help illuminate the course content.
    Introduction to Television orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:World Cinema or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:World Cinema is a class in which students look at films from around the world. They explore various non-English-speaking countries' contributions to filmmaking and world culture that have been made by these countries' films. They look at two films from each country studied: one that exemplifies the historical/cultural concept that is associated with that country's films and one contemporary film from that country. The course consists of viewing, analyzing, discussing and writing about films from other cultures films as a means of understanding the impact of these works on our own as well as other cultures.
    World Cinema orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: TFT         Course Number:1710
    Course Title:Oral Interpretation and Traditions      Goal Areas:01,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:Oral Interpretation and Traditions is an introductory course in the effective oral presentation of written material. Students will analyze and perform literature from a variety of sources that represent different cultures and ethnicities. Students will also make connections between the cultural implications of oral tradition and performance.
    Oral Interpretation and TraditionsView01,08 3
     
    Goal Area 9: Ethical and Civic Responsibility
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Ethical and Civic Responsibility - 1 course
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1610
    Course Title:Introduction to Mass Communication or      Goal Areas:01,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for understanding mass media; for recognizing messages, making deliberate choices about them, and evaluating the effects of these messages in both an individual and societal context. Students will examine the history, evolution, and societal impact of a wide variety of media, including print, film, and social media and will develop skills to make informed, ethical evaluations of the mediated messages they receive.
    Introduction to Mass Communication orView01,09 3
    Course Subject: COMM         Course Number:1810
    Course Title:Introduction to Health Communication or      Goal Areas:01,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This introductory course is intended to develop critical and analytical skills for understanding human communication in the health care industry. Students will discuss and apply various communication strategies in a variety of contexts, including patient care, between healthcare professionals, and with a larger public in the form of healthcare advocacy campaigns. The impact of cultural diversity and ethics in decision-making will be examined in the context of healthcare professions.
    Introduction to Health Communication orView01,09 3
    Course Subject: ECON         Course Number:1050
    Course Title:Economics of Crime or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course covers economics theories of crime and justice. Crime topics include: illegal drug markets, violent crime, nonviolent crime, and international crime. Economic theories and concepts such as rationality, efficiency, supply, and demand are used. The course includes international and historical comparisons of enforcement techniques from both an economic efficiency framework and an ethical perspective.
    Economics of Crime orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2390
    Course Title:American Working-Class Literature or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description: This course, providing much needed exposure to a largely overlooked body of writings, introduces students to a variety of classical and contemporary working-class texts that demonstrate literatures rich engagement with industrial, agricultural, domestic, and/or other labor in the United States. Encompassing writings by and about laborers and persons associated with labor, working-class literature reveals the often hidden ways that the material conditions and cultural expectations tied to class and work influence the shape of daily life and its literary expressions. Featuring textual, visual, and/or audio cultural productions, the course is designed to examine the problems and questions raised by working-class texts, which may include the changing nature of work, the dynamic experience of class, the historical circumstances that structure class, the intersection of literature and labor movements, the unstable definitions of literature, and the political dimensions of literature. The course may be organized historically or topically.
    American Working-Class Literature orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2950
    Course Title:Mystery and Detective Fiction or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to mystery and detective fiction as a literary genre and as popular literature, examining the conventions of suspense writing, possibly including hook, twist, red herring, back story, sub-plot, procedural, clues, and the ethical concerns of investigative methods and civic life. Discussion of various sub-genre styles will engage students in critical thinking applied to historical era, culturally diverse contexts, and gender roles in mystery writing.
    Mystery and Detective Fiction orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido orn/a3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1211
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I or      Goal Areas:08,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:Join in an interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. Realize how Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and technique can be integrated into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build health, respect and responsibility through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I orView08,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1212
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II or      Goal Areas:08,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a continuation of the interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. It will include further study of Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and the next level of techniques, integrating what is learned into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build health, respect and responsibility through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II orView08,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1213
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido III or      Goal Areas:08,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a continuation of the interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. It will include further study of Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and the next level of technique, integrating what is learned into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build sincere people through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido III orView08,09 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Practical Applications of Traditional Aikido or      Goal Areas:07,09       Credits:2

    Course Description:This course uses Traditional Aikido (a Japanese martial art) in order to help the student gain skills both on and off the mat, applying them to his or her profession and daily life. The student will research, study, and practice real-life scenarios and situations of de-escalation, protection, compliance, and restraint- maximizing safety, focus, awareness, and control. Aikido is a life-giving tool. This class appeals to the beginner and experienced Aikido student. It is ideal for Criminal Justice, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Military, and Security jobs as well as other service professions. *Note: This course is an elective course in Global and Cultural Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 7 & 8. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.
    Practical Applications of Traditional Aikido orView07,09 2
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1320
    Course Title:Community Organizing I or      Goal Areas:07,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:The focus of this course will be developing leadership skills through community organizing and empowering students to make lasting changes at the college, in their own communities and the world. Students will examine past and present social movements with a special focus on organizing in communities of color. This course will also explore the contemporary meanings of community in the United States. Students will learn to identify the leader within by examining the relationship between community and citizenship. This course will also focus on issues of diversity and sustainable communities with the practical application of active leadership techniques and creative organizing on our campus. This could include aspects of the annual Earth Week Program such as Marketing, PR, Event Planning, Budgeting, Community Partnerships, Cross Campus and Cross cultural collaborations, and curriculum integration.
    Community Organizing I orView07,09 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:1700
    Course Title:History and Popular Culture or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    History and Popular Culture orn/a3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:2600
    Course Title:Intellectual History or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will examine cultural, religious, artistic, and scientific ideas in their historical contexts, explore arguments regarding the manner in which particular ideas both reflect and create the values of their own time, and investigate the manner in which certain ideas are viewed retrospectively from various subsequent historical periods. The class will read a variety of intellectual and imaginative works that will illustrate the process by which ideas are transmitted historically, and specific ideas considered will include but will not be limited to fundamentalism, nationalism, romanticism, and totalitarianism.
    Intellectual History orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: HIST         Course Number:2700
    Course Title:History and Popular Culture or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines the relationship between history and popular culture, with an emphasis on the value of popular culture entertainment as a historical source for both the past and the present. We will examine several examples of popular culture entertainment (including but not limited to film, novels, comics, etc) that are set in a historical period. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the historical periods depicted in selected popular culture sources, as well as the historical periods in which the sources were produced. Students will also examine questions of ethical representation of the past in popular culture. Through this course, students will begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze various types of sources as historical evidence. It is recommended that students complete a 1000-level history course and a semester of college English before taking this course.
    History and Popular Culture orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1211
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1212
    Course Title:The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II orn/a3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Ethics or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to both the methods and issues connected with thinking about morality and ethical systems. Moral skepticism will also be examined. The aim of this class is to allow students to be more aware of their own ethical modes of thinking and the diversity of ways morality enters into human lives.
    Ethics orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1070
    Course Title:Political Philosophy or      Goal Areas:06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:In this course we will examine issues in political philosophy through discussion of a range of primary western and non-western historical texts from ancient, medieval, and modern political writers. In the process of this examination of the historical development of political philosophy, a variety of topics will be explored such as: diverse theories of human nature and their implications for the role of government, the dynamics of power, the ideals of duty, justice, liberty and equality, and justifications for private property, profit, and civil disobedience.
    Political Philosophy orView06,09 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Informal Reasoning for Problem Solving or      Goal Areas:02,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies methods of problem solving, utilizing principles that distinguish good reasoning from poor reasoning. Students will evaluate claims and arguments in natural language, applying the concepts of validity, truth, induction, deduction, and relevance. Students will develop clear thinking, and recognize, criticize and avoid common fallacies. Conceptual analysis will be applied to areas of practical reasoning, to human values, to develop science and media literacy, and to further student self-awareness.
    Informal Reasoning for Problem Solving orView02,09 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Environmental Philosophy or      Goal Areas:06,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:Environmental Philosophy is concerned with developing rational and moral theories of dealing with our environmental concerns and discussing ways of putting them into practice. Using a variety of specific philosophical perspectives, we will examine the effects of population growth, ecosystem destruction, species extinction, pollution, climate change, resource extraction, agriculture, etc. on humans and the environment. We will develop ways of understanding relationships between humans and the environment and ways of acting on our responsibilities to the natural world and its inhabitants.
    Environmental Philosophy orView06,10 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1210
    Course Title:Global Justice, Peace and Conflict or      Goal Areas:06,08       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course acquaints the student with the major philosophical and ethical dilemmas arising from conflicts within and between societies, with an effort to promote critical awareness and communication around peace and global justice. From a range of philosophical perspectives, students will consider global conflicts, such as those arising from war, nationalism, immigration, environmental crises, discrimination, terrorism, and global poverty. Students will seek to understand such concepts as justice, tolerance, self-determination, equality, fairness, and governance, in an effort to draw conclusions about causes of and solutions to global crises. Students will consider personal and societal strategies for conflict resolution and nonviolent change.
    Global Justice, Peace and Conflict orView06,08 3
    Course Subject: PHIL         Course Number:1220
    Course Title:Health Care Ethics or      Goal Areas:02,06,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course looks at the underlying assumptions that affect beliefs, practices, and policies in contemporary health care. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of the ethical principles and theories related to health care. A wide variety of health care issues and the challenges they present will be studied. Critical thinking skills will be emphasized in determining the best course of action for making ethical decisions in the health care field.
    Health Care Ethics orView02,06,09 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1100
    Course Title:American Government and Politics or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is a general introduction to American politics with emphasis on the Constitution, citizen participation, elections, and the role of the major governmental institutions - Congress, presidency and judiciary - in the formulation of public policy in the United States.
    American Government and Politics orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: POLS         Course Number:1140
    Course Title:State and Local Politics or      Goal Areas:05,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies the operation and structure of state governments including executive, legislative, judicial functions as well as elections and policy formation, with an emphasis on Minnesota.
    State and Local Politics orView05,09 3
    Course Subject: SOC         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:Social Problems/Deviance      Goal Areas:07,09       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course examines issues and concerns in the modern world such as population, global warming, the environment, natural resources, terrorism, poverty, racism, sexism, mental illness, drug abuse, crime, sexual assault, prostitution and suicide. Social policies designed to deal with those issues are also considered. Prerequisite: Soc 1110
    Social Problems/DevianceView07,09 3
     
    Goal Area 10: People and the Environment
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    People and the Environment - 1 course
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Intro to Anthropology: Physical Anthropology, Archaeology & Prehistory or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course studies the relationship of prehistoric physical and cultural origins and development of humankind to the establishment of the first civilizations of the Old and New worlds. It examines the archaeological evidence for the theory of bio-cultural evolution, which helps to explain both the prehistoric developments and much of the cultural variation that is in the world today. The course does include a lab-like experience.
    Intro to Anthropology: Physical Anthropology, Archaeology & Prehistory orView03,10 3
    Course Subject: ANTH         Course Number:1130
    Course Title:The Archaeology of Ancient Europe or      Goal Areas:05,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:Anthropology is concerned with the many ways that humans have adapted to their physical and social environments, including the systems of meaning and social organization that they use, as well as the historical development of those adaptions. There are a number of subfields within Anthropology in America: (Archaeology, Physical Anthropology, Linguistics, and applied Anthropology), and this course focuses on the remote past of Europe before the advent of writing (history), as revealed through archaeological research. We will focus primarily on Termperate Europe (north of the Alps), but to do so we will repeatedly run into the sophisticated cultures of the Mediterranean Basin. Evidence will be considered starting with the first people in Europe, through millennia of hunting and gathering, and then then the broad changes that occurred with the advent of agriculture and metal use, and the increasing societal complexity, ending with the coming of the Romans who brought "civilization" to their northern neighbors.
    The Archaeology of Ancient Europe orView05,10 3
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Boundary Waters Canoe Area Field Biology or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is a lecture, lab, and field based course in which students will study the biological communities and ecology of the mixed coniferous/deciduous forests, lakes, and wetland ecosystems of the BWCA region. The course culminates with an eight to nine day long field trip to the area. This course is open to all students.
    Boundary Waters Canoe Area Field Biology orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Global Environment Field Biology or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course will introduce students to the ecology and environmental issues of various locations abroad, and present them within the context of the social, cultural and political conditions of that country or region. Students will examine how various cultures and societies approach ecological and environmental problems. The impact of globalization on these issues will be a major focus of the course. Students will travel to the country or region of study to examine first-hand the issues covered in the course.
    Global Environment Field Biology orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1200
    Course Title:Current Environmental Issues or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:Using an interdisciplinary approach, this course examines various aspects of natural and human-made ecosystems, human's intervention, and the subsequent impact on society and nature. It emphasizes current problems, values, and projection for the future. The lab involves internet exercises, videos, group discussion, individual and group projects, field trips and other outdoor activities. (3 hours lecture, 4 hours lab)
    Current Environmental Issues orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1600
    Course Title:Biology of Nature Series or      Goal Areas:10       Credits:1

    Course Description:Explore the natural history of Minnesota! A series of courses on topics as diverse as wetlands, wild flowers, edible plants, predatory birds, prairie ecology, and winter biology are offered throughout the year. These one-credit courses are taught on an introductory level. Each course may be taken for one credit.
    Biology of Nature Series orView10 1
    Course Subject: BIOL         Course Number:1610
    Course Title:Field Ecology or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:1

    Course Description:This course is a team-taught, field-based introduction to the flora, fauna and biological communities of the woodland, lake, and wetland ecosystems of northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. This course is a field experience including observations, hypothesis, predictions, and evaluation of scientific data and results. A three-day trip to a university biological field station provides the venue for this hands-on course which is open to all students.
    Field Ecology orView03,10 1
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1000
    Course Title:Chemistry and Society or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This is a basic introduction to chemistry in the everyday world, with emphasis on the role that chemistry plays in personal and professional lives. It is intended for anyone seeking to become a better informed citizen of our technological society. Basic chemical principles will be introduced and their impact on society will be discussed. The course enables students to use concepts of chemistry to think critically about current issues in science and technology. No background in Chemistry or other Natural Sciences is presumed; a strong background in math is not required. Heavy use of the internet for research and communication will be an important component of this course. This course is recommended for non-science majors looking to fulfill the science course with lab component. (3 hours lecture / 3 hours lab)
    Chemistry and Society orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: CHEM         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Introduction to Chemistry or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:An introduction to the basic concepts of Chemistry along with mathematical application, which include the atomic theory, periodic trends, stoichiometric relationships, kinetic-molecular theory, molecular structure, heat transfer, and chemical properties as related to the gas and liquid and solid phases. Additionally, this course will explore the role that chemistry plays in our personal and professional lives. This course enables students to think critically about current environmental issues in science. The lab portion contains experiments that includes observation, data collection and analysis, and mathematical applications that support the concepts being studied in class. The course is designed for non-science majors or students who have not completed chemistry in high school in order to prepare them to take Chem 1061 or courses in various health programs. Prerequisite: Math 0900 or Math 0980 with a grade of 'C' or better.
    Introduction to Chemistry orView03,10 4
    Course Subject: ENGL         Course Number:2340
    Course Title:Nature in Literature or      Goal Areas:06,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course surveys literature that examines the relation between human beings and the natural world as that relationship has been variously conceived by British, American, and other writers. The literary works studied may begin with the pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance and focus on literature from the late eighteenth-century, nineteenth century, and contemporary works. The primary consideration of this course is on how a literary idea of nature has been affected and effected by variations in culture, namely, changes in politics, economics, and technology that in diverse cultural and historical contexts have created conflicts between ecological and human interests. Ultimately this study leads to considering how the "green language" created by the writers under study has contributed to an eco-critical ethic that allows examination of current ecological sensibilities and the language that represents them. The course may also engage oriental literature, for many American and British authors have aligned their thinking on nature with eastern religions. Additionally, the content will reference painters, philosophers, and composers whose works contribute a relevant understanding of nature-as they may lead into relevant scientific considerations of nature. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or Engl 1201
    Nature in Literature orView06,10 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Introduction to Japanese Culture or      Goal Areas:06,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course is an introduction to and interdisciplinary exploration of Japanese culture. Through the study of Japanese humanities and fine arts, people and the environment, students will identify what makes Japanese Culture so unique and how the Japanese Mind/Spirit (nihon no kokoro) and their connection to the environment and other non-human species has shaped Japanese society from days of old to the present.
    Introduction to Japanese Culture orView06,10 3
    Course Subject: GCST         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota or      Goal Areas:07,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This American Indian cultural course will provide students with an overview, past and present, of the cultures of Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota, including music, dance, art, the oral story telling tradition and the American Indian connection with the environment and other non-human species. Students will also analyze how these vibrant cultures have survived oppression and genocide, and continue to thrive. Through exploring this living culture, students will gain understanding of Indigenous Peoples strong connection with, and stewardship of, the environment, learn about an important aspect of human and global diversity, and our interconnectedness with each other and our environment.
    American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota orView07,10 3
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Physical Geography or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course will provide an introduction to the physical processes that are at work at all times on the surface of the earth. This course provides an introduction to the processes that influence the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere. Topics covered include earthquakes, volcanoes, tornadoes, blizzards, winds, precipitation, the Hydrological Cycle, vegetation and soil. This course includes a basic understanding of how these systems interact and how the physical landscape interacts with the human landscape. Included in this will be discussions about environmental concerns such as acid precipitation, ozone depletion, soil degradation, desertification and rainforest destruction. This course includes lab-like coursework/exams that will enhance a student's ability to make observations, form questions, pose hypotheses, make predictions and critically evaluate scientific data and results.
    Physical Geography orView03,10 3
    Course Subject: GEOG         Course Number:1190
    Course Title:Area Studies or      Goal Areas:08,10       Credits:3

    Course Description:This course provides the opportunity to use the geographic foundations of spatial relationships and apply those with concentration to specific topics. Spatial relationships will be studied using the standard geography methodology of examining phenomena--the locations of, descriptions of and interrelationships of that phenomena on the surface of the earth. Topics will include economics, politics, religion, population, flora, fauna, language and regions. This concentrated study will includes an examination of the human/land relationship.
    Area Studies orView08,10 3
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1010
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Glacial Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Glacial Geology orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1020
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Volcanic, Plutonic and Metamorphic Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Volcanic, Plutonic and Metamorphic Geology orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Fluvial Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Fluvial Geology orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:Minnesota Field Geology Series: Caves, Karst and Ancient Seaways or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:2

    Course Description:
    Minnesota Field Geology Series: Caves, Karst and Ancient Seaways orn/a2
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1120
    Course Title:Historical Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Historical Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1150
    Course Title:Boundary Waters Field Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Boundary Waters Field Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1160
    Course Title:Global Environmental Field Geology or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:4

    Course Description:
    Global Environmental Field Geology orn/a4
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1850
    Course Title:Oceanography or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Oceanography orn/a3
    Course Subject: GEOL         Course Number:1851
    Course Title:Oceanography Lab or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:1

    Course Description:
    Oceanography Lab orn/a1
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1030
    Course Title:Introduction to Japanese Culture or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    Introduction to Japanese Culture orn/a3
    Course Subject: INTD         Course Number:1040
    Course Title:American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota or      Goal Areas:n/a      Credits:3

    Course Description:
    American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota orn/a3
    Course Subject: NSCI         Course Number:1110
    Course Title:Minnesota's Natural History or      Goal Areas:03,10       Credits:4

    Course Description:This course is a team-taught, field-based introduction to the flora, fauna, ecology, and geologic development of Minnesota. A series of in-class sessions will prepare students for recognition and identification of plants, animals, habitats, and geologic features and for the integration of these biotic and abiotic components of ecosystems. This course will include an examination of natural resource issues and policies in the context of Minnesota's politics and economy. Two weekend field trips are mandatory. These field trips will begin on Friday afternoon and end on Sunday afternoon or early evening. This course fulfills lab requirement for Goal Area 3. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)
    Minnesota's Natural History orView03,10 4
    PHIL1200Environmental Philosophy3
     
    MnTC Note
     
    40 Credits from ALL MNTC Courses: Goal Areas 1-10: AMST1010(3), AMST1020(3), AMST2210(3), AMST2220(3), ANTH1010(3), ANTH1020(3), ANTH1130(3), ANTH1140(3), ARBC1030(3), ARBC1101(4), ARBC1102(4), ARBC2201(4), ART1040(3), ART1101(3), ART1102(3), ART1160(3), ART1170(3), ART1270(3), ART1301(3), ART1302(3), ART1310(3), ART1320(3), ART1340(3), ART1341(3), ART1361(3), ART1362(3), ART1401(3), ART1402(3), ART1770(3), ART1810(1), ART1820(2), ART2180(3), ART2190(3), ART2300(2), ART2611(3), ART2612(3), ART2640(3), ART2740(1), ART2750(1), ART2780(1), ART2781(1), ART2782(1), ART2800(1), ART2820(1), ART2860(1), ART2900(1), ART2970(1), ASL1101(4), ASL1102(4), ASL1300(3), ASL2201(4), ASL2202(4), BIOL1000(4), BIOL1001(4), BIOL1002(4), BIOL1030(4), BIOL1101(4), BIOL1102(4), BIOL1120(3), BIOL1130(4), BIOL1140(4), BIOL1160(4), BIOL1200(4), BIOL1350(3), BIOL1360(4), BIOL1600(1), BIOL1610(1), BIOL1650(1), BIOL2020(4), BIOL2030(4), BIOL2100(4), BIOL2111(4), BIOL2112(4), BIOL2360(4), CHEM1000(4), CHEM1010(4), CHEM1030(4), CHEM1061(4), CHEM1062(4), COMM1010(3), COMM1110(3), COMM1210(3), COMM1310(3), COMM1410(3), COMM1510(3), COMM1610(3), COMM1710(3), COMM1810(3), COMM1910(3), ECON1050(3), ECON1060(3), ECON1070(3), ENGL1111(3), ENGL1112(3), ENGL1150(3), ENGL1200(4), ENGL1201(4), ENGL1202(2), ENGL1250(2), ENGL1400(3), ENGL1450(3), ENGL1900(3), ENGL1950(3), ENGL2010(3), ENGL2020(3), ENGL2030(3), ENGL2270(3), ENGL2300(3), ENGL2310(3), ENGL2320(3), ENGL2330(3), ENGL2340(3), ENGL2350(3), ENGL2360(3), ENGL2370(3), ENGL2380(3), ENGL2390(3), ENGL2450(3), ENGL2460(3), ENGL2550(3), ENGL2560(3), ENGL2580(3), ENGL2590(3), ENGL2900(3), ENGL2950(3), GCST1030(3), GCST1040(3), GCST1210(3), GCST1211(3), GCST1212(3), GCST1213(3), GCST1220(2), GCST1320(3), GEOG1000(2), GEOG1010(3), GEOG1040(3), GEOG1100(3), GEOG1190(3), GEOL1010(2), GEOL1020(2), GEOL1030(2), GEOL1040(2), GEOL1110(4), GEOL1120(4), GEOL1130(4), GEOL1150(4), GEOL1160(4), GEOL1850(3), GEOL1851(1), GERM1030(3), HIST1010(3), HIST1020(3), HIST1030(3), HIST1110(3), HIST1120(3), HIST1130(3), HIST1140(3), HIST1200(3), HIST1210(3), HIST1220(3), HIST1240(3), HIST1270(3), HIST1700(3), HIST1800(3), HIST1900(1), HIST2500(3), HIST2600(3), HIST2700(3), HUM1210(3), INTD1030(3), INTD1040(3), INTD1210(3), INTD1211(3), INTD1212(3), MATH1010(3), MATH1031(3), MATH1032(3), MATH1080(3), MATH1090(4), MATH1130(3), MATH1140(3), MATH1150(3), MATH1160(4), MATH1170(4), MATH1180(5), MATH1190(5), MATH1200(3), MATH1221(5), MATH1222(5), MATH2010(3), MATH2220(5), MATH2300(3), MATH2400(3), MUSC1130(1), MUSC1160(1), MUSC1170(1), MUSC1180(1), MUSC1200(3), MUSC1220(3), MUSC1241(3), MUSC1242(3), MUSC1300(3), MUSC1320(1), MUSC1350(3), MUSC1500(2), MUSC1501(2), MUSC1502(2), MUSC1510(1), MUSC1560(1), MUSC1600(2), MUSC1610(1), MUSC1800(2), MUSC1801(2), MUSC1802(2), MUSC1810(1), MUSC1830(1), MUSC1850(1), MUSC1860(1), MUSC1870(1), MUSC2010(2), MUSC2170(3), MUSC2180(3), MUSC2241(3), MUSC2242(3), MUSC2970(1), NSCI1000(4), NSCI1010(1), NSCI1020(1), NSCI1030(1), NSCI1050(4), NSCI1060(3), NSCI1061(1), NSCI1070(3), NSCI1071(1), NSCI1110(4), NSCI1120(4), PHIL1010(3), PHIL1020(3), PHIL1030(3), PHIL1040(3), PHIL1050(3), PHIL1060(3), PHIL1070(3), PHIL1110(3), PHIL1200(3), PHIL1210(3), PHIL1220(3), PHYS1000(4), PHYS1030(4), PHYS1050(4), PHYS1060(3), PHYS1061(1), PHYS1070(3), PHYS1071(1), PHYS1120(4), PHYS1140(3), PHYS1201(5), PHYS1202(5), PHYS1400(3), PHYS1410(1), PHYS1450(3), PHYS1460(1), PHYS1601(5), PHYS1602(5), POLS1100(3), POLS1140(3), POLS1600(3), POLS1700(3), POLS2130(3), PSYC1110(3), PSYC1150(3), PSYC1160(4), PSYC1165(3), PSYC1170(3), PSYC1210(3), PSYC1220(3), PSYC1250(4), PSYC2110(3), PSYC2320(3), PSYC2330(3), PSYC2340(3), PSYC2350(3), SOC1110(3), SOC1130(3), SOC1710(3), SOC1750(3), SOC2110(3), SOC2200(3), SOC2210(3), SOC2410(3), SOC2730(3), SPAN1030(3), SPAN1101(5), SPAN1102(5), SPAN2201(5), SPAN2202(5), TFT1200(3), TFT1210(3), TFT1250(3), TFT1260(3), TFT1270(3), TFT1280(3), TFT1310(3), TFT1320(3), TFT1350(3), TFT1500(3), TFT1510(3), TFT1520(3), TFT1531(3), TFT1532(3), TFT1540(3), TFT1600(1), TFT1610(1), TFT1710(3), TFT2010(3), TFT2500(3), TFT2950(1), WOST0101(4), WOST0999(3), WOST1110(3)
     
    Health Requirement
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Health and Exercise Science - 2 courses, 4 credits, one Health course and one Exercise Science course: EXSC1010(2), EXSC1020(1), EXSC1041(1), EXSC1042(1), EXSC1050(1), EXSC1070(1), EXSC1110(1), EXSC1130(1), EXSC1140(1), EXSC1151(1), EXSC1152(1), EXSC1200(1), EXSC1210(1), EXSC1230(1), EXSC1240(1), EXSC1250(3), EXSC1260(1), EXSC1270(1), EXSC1310(1), EXSC1400(1), EXSC1420(1), EXSC1430(1), EXSC1440(1), EXSC1451(1), EXSC1452(1), EXSC1500(3), EXSC1510(2), EXSC1520(3), EXSC1600(1), EXSC1610(1), EXSC1630(1), EXSC1640(1), EXSC1700(3), EXSC1710(3), EXSC1720(2), EXSC1730(1), EXSC1740(1), EXSC1750(1), EXSC1751(1), EXSC1752(1), EXSC1760(1), EXSC1800(1), EXSC1810(1), EXSC1820(1), EXSC1830(1), EXSC1840(1), EXSC1850(1), EXSC1990(1), EXSC2101(4), EXSC2102(2), EXSC2110(3), EXSC2390(3), EXSC2490(4), HLTH1030(3), HLTH1040(3), HLTH1050(3), HLTH1060(3), HLTH1070(3), HLTH1080(3), HLTH1100(3), HLTH1250(3), HLTH1600(3), HLTH1900(3), HLTH1990(1)
     
    Electives
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    Elective credits, excluding under 1000 level, to reach 60 credits
     
    NHCC Residency and GPA
    CoursesTitlesCourse OutlinesGoal AreasCredits
    15 Credits must be earned at NHCC
     
                                   Total Credit Required60

  • Program Outcomes

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    Develop a foundation of essential knowledge about the cultural, social, and natural worlds, and individual well-being.


    Develop intellectual and practical skills, including:



    • understanding the commonalities and diversity of the human experience, values, and opinions

    • understanding the forms of artistic expression and their inherent creative processes

    • thinking critically, applying systematic reasoning, and developing information management quantitative skills

    • communicating clearly and effectively


    Demonstrate personal and social responsibility, including:



    • developing a code for personal and civic life as a responsible citizen in a democracy

    • maintaining good mental and physical health and social adjustment

    • seeking new knowledge independently


    Integrative and applied learning, including:



    • the ability to apply General Education to the issues of our times


     


    Be prepared to transfer to, and succeed, at an upper-level academic institution.

  • Career Opportunities

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    Information on careers, including salary and employment outlook data, is available on the iseek and Bureau of Labor Statistics websites: www.iseek.org and www.bls.gov.

  • Transfer Information

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    If you are planning on transferring to another institution, follow the guidelines available on our transfer resources web page to help you plan the process: Transfer Information

  • Degree Information

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    The Associate of Arts (A.A.) is awarded for successful completion of 60 credits and is designed to constitute the first two years of a liberal arts bachelor degree program. An A.A. degree includes the entire 40 credit Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) as the general education requirement. Students may also choose to concentrate in a particular field of study in preparation for a planned major or professional emphasis at a four-year college by following the pre-major requirement of the desired transfer institution in addition to the MnTC and A.A. requirements.


    A student shall:



    • Earn a minimum of 60 semester credits.

    • Earn a grade point average of 2.00 (C) or higher in courses taken at North Hennepin Community College.

    • Earn a minimum of 20 semester credits of the 60 semester credits required for the A.A. Degree at NHCC.

    • Complete the general education distribution requirement listed in the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum. The student shall select general education (MnTC) courses numbered 1000 or above to complete a minimum of 40 credits.

    • Have four years in which to complete their work under the terms of the catalog in effect at the time of their first enrollment.

    • Students taking more than four years to complete their graduation requirements may follow any catalog in effect during the four-year period preceding their date of graduation.


    Required A.A. Degree Course Distribution:



    • Complete 40 credits in the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum satisfying the requirements for each of the 10 goal areas.

    • Complete at least 4 credits for the Wellness requirement with at least one course from each of the following areas: Health (all courses) and Physical Education (all courses).

    • Complete 16 elective credits selected from all courses listed in the College's offerings, which are numbered 1000 or higher.


    Completion of an A.A. degree fulfills the Goal Area 2 requirement of the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC).
    Note: Courses can satisfy more than one goal area, however, credits may only be counted once toward the 60 credit minimum.


    Developmental Courses
    Some students may need preparatory course(s) in Math and/or English. Courses numbered below 1000 will not apply toward a degree.


    Equal Opportunity Employer and Disability Access Information
    North Hennepin Community College is a member of Minnesota State Colleges and Universities system and an equal opportunity employer and educator. This document is available in alternative formats to individuals with disabilities by calling 763-493-0555 or through the Minnesota Relay Service at 1-800-627-3529.

  • Accreditation

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    North Hennepin Community College is accredited by the: Higher Learning Commission 30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 1-800-621-7440

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MnTC/Goal Area Information

The Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC) provides the general education distribution requirements for the Associate of Arts degree and provides the general education component for each of the career programs. The MnTC is designed to give students a college-level general education curriculum that focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to be successful in modern society. 

The MnTC curriculum will be accepted by any Minnesota public higher education institution to fulfill the lower division general education requirements for a Bachelor in Arts degree. Students must complete at least 40 credits in MnTC courses distributed over the ten goal areas. Credits can only be counted toward the 40 credit MnTC minimum, but may fulfill more than one goal area.