NHCC | North Hennepin Community College

Course Descriptions

HIST 1010    World History: Origins to 1300     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines world history from its origins to end of the 13th century. Although it is important for students of world history to have a nuanced understanding of cultures, states, and other entities that constitute the fabric of human history, the primary focus of the world historian is the study of phenomena that transcends single states, regions, or cultures. In other words, world history is not the study of the histories of discrete cultures and states one after another and in isolation from one another: world history is transregional, transnational, and transcultural. As long as one focuses on the big picture of cultural interchange and/or comparative history, one is a practicing world historian.



HIST 1020    World History: 1300 to Present     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines world history from the 14th century to the present. Although it is important for students of world history to have a nuanced understanding of cultures, states, and other entities that constitute the fabric of human history, the primary focus of the world historian is the study of phenomena that transcends single states, regions, or cultures. In other words, world history is not the study of the histories of discrete cultures and states one after another and in isolation from one another: world history is transregional, transnational, and transcultural. As long as one focuses on the big picture of cultural interchange and/or comparative history, one is a practicing world historian.



HIST 1030    Colonial History of the Americas     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines the human migratory phase that led to the initial peopling of the Americas beginning ca. 35,000 BCE; it explores the first colonial period that began ca. 7500 BCE with the rise of domesticated agriculture and the consequent establishment of major civilizations in South America, Meso-America, and North America; and it covers the second colonial period initiated by the arrival of the Spanish in 1492 and that began drawing to a conclusion in the late eighteenth century. Study of the second colonial period includes the colonization of North America, Central America, The Caribbean, and South America by six European empires: the Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, Russian, and English.



HIST 1110    History of Western Civilization Pre 1550     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines the development of Western Civilization from ancient origins through the Reformation. We will consider various "western" civilizations ranging from ancient Mesopotamian civilizations to Early Modern Europe, following a chronological progression, while maintaining a broad geographic scope. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the different Western civilizations and the periods in which they flourished, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence.



HIST 1120    History of Western Civilization 1550 to Present     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Reformation to the present. The course will focus on social, political, and cultural developments in Europe, covering topics such as the Industrial Revolution and Globalization in the 20th century. The course will also examine how these developments affected the rest of the world. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.



HIST 1130    History of the Medieval West     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines the development of the three major Western cultures that emerged during the Middle Ages: Western Europe, Byzantium, and Islam. Specific emphasis will be given to the interactions between these three cultures, both positive and negative. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.



HIST 1140    History of the Ancient West     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

This course examines the origins and development of civilizations surrounding the Mediterranean, such as the Egyptians, Hittites, Greeks, and Romans, during the ancient period, from about 3000 BC through about AD 300. The course will explore the contact between the various ancient civilizations, and will seek to understand both the tendency toward empire-creation in the ancient world, and the proclivity of those empires to collapse. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the history of the period, as well as begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze documents as historical evidence, and to present a historical argument.



HIST 1200    History of United States Through 1877     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,07     View Course Outline

This course focuses on the major cultural, social, and political issues in United States history from the revolutionary period through Reconstruction. We look at the ideas that led to the revolution, how the thirteen colonies assembled themselves into a republic, the consequences of slave culture to the course of American history, and the promises and failures of Reconstruction. The student will come to understand the multiple and inter-related forces relevant to the early years of the republic.



HIST 1210    History of the United States Since 1877     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,07     View Course Outline

This course focuses on the major social and cultural issues in United This course focuses on the major cultural, social and political issues in United States history from the late nineteenth century Gilded Age through the end of the twentieth century. We look at the influence of the industrial revolution, the impact of increasing levels of European and Asian immigration, the rise of organized labor, the Great Depression, the Cold War, the impact of United States foreign policy, and countercultural movements. The student will gain insight into the aspects that are most crucial for a solid understanding of the nation's history.



HIST 1270    Race in America     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,07     View Course Outline

This course investigates the role played by race in the shaping of United States history. We examine the concept of race and the historical relationships in America between those of African, Asian, European, and Native descents. We will examine Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Movement and current racial issues. The goal is to broaden student understanding of United States history by a focused study of its multi-faceted racial relationships throughout the centuries.



HIST 1990    History Special Topics     Credits  1-4         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course will provide flexibility in offering an in-depth review of topics of immediate importance and topical interest. These topics will go beyond the introductory courses in examining specific aspects of the subject matter.



HIST 2500    World Regional History     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,08     View Course Outline

Each semester this course is devoted to the history of a specific world region, and the region will change from semester to semester. The goal is to provide the student with the opportunity for an in-depth study of specific societies and specific cultures from around the world. The course may be repeated for credit under a different subtitle as the subject matter changes.



HIST 2600    Intellectual History     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,09     View Course Outline

This course will examine cultural, religious, artistic, and scientific ideas in their historical contexts, explore arguments regarding the manner in which particular ideas both reflect and create the values of their own time, and investigate the manner in which certain ideas are viewed retrospectively from various subsequent historical periods. The class will read a variety of intellectual and imaginative works that will illustrate the process by which ideas are transmitted historically, and specific ideas considered will include but will not be limited to fundamentalism, nationalism, romanticism, and totalitarianism.



HIST 2700    History and Popular Culture     Credits  3         Goal Areas  05,09     View Course Outline

This course examines the relationship between history and popular culture, with an emphasis on the value of popular culture entertainment as a historical source for both the past and the present. We will examine several examples of popular culture entertainment (including but not limited to film, novels, comics, etc) that are set in a historical period. Students are expected to gain a working knowledge of the historical periods depicted in selected popular culture sources, as well as the historical periods in which the sources were produced. Students will also examine questions of ethical representation of the past in popular culture. Through this course, students will begin to develop the skills necessary to analyze various types of sources as historical evidence. It is recommended that students complete a 1000-level history course and a semester of college English before taking this course.



HIST 2900    Applied History     Credits  3         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course is a writing-intensive research methods course that incorporates a service-learning component. Students will learn how to use and interpret various historical sources, such as archival material, oral history, photographs and video. Students will also learn how to use and interpret secondary source materials. The goal of the course is for the students to produce a publishable-quality research paper on a topic related to local history, with an emphasis on the relationship between local history and larger historical developments at the state, national, and/or global level. Prerequisite: Any 1000 level history class; English 1201-1202 Sequence