NHCC | North Hennepin Community College

Course Descriptions

GCST 1030    Introduction to Japanese Culture     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,10     View Course Outline

This course is an introduction to and interdisciplinary exploration of Japanese culture. Through the study of Japanese humanities and fine arts, people and the environment, students will identify what makes Japanese Culture so unique and how the Japanese Mind/Spirit (nihon no kokoro) and their connection to the environment and other non-human species has shaped Japanese society from days of old to the present.



GCST 1040    American Indian Culture - Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota     Credits  3         Goal Areas  07,10     View Course Outline

This American Indian cultural course will provide students with an overview, past and present, of the cultures of Indigenous Peoples of Minnesota, including music, dance, art, the oral story telling tradition and the American Indian connection with the environment and other non-human species. Students will also analyze how these vibrant cultures have survived oppression and genocide, and continue to thrive. Through exploring this living culture, students will gain understanding of Indigenous Peoples strong connection with, and stewardship of, the environment, learn about an important aspect of human and global diversity, and our interconnectedness with each other and our environment.



GCST 1211    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido I     Credits  3         Goal Areas  08,09     View Course Outline

Join in an interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. Realize how Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and technique can be integrated into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build health, respect and responsibility through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.



GCST 1212    The History, Philosophy and Practice of Traditional Aikido II     Credits  3         Goal Areas  08,09     View Course Outline

This course is a continuation of the interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. It will include further study of Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and the next level of techniques, integrating what is learned into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build health, respect and responsibility through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.



GCST 1213    The History, Philosophy, and Practice of Traditional Aikido III     Credits  3         Goal Areas  08,09     View Course Outline

This course is a continuation of the interdisciplinary exploration of the Japanese martial art Aikido through mental and physical practice. It will include further study of Aikidos unique history, philosophy, and the next level of technique, integrating what is learned into everyday living to strengthen mind and body, appreciate nature, respect others, build positive relations, and contribute to society. Definition: Aikido is a traditional Japanese martial art. Its system includes hand-to-hand, sword, and staff techniques. Aikido principles are based on harmonizing mind and body with a partners attack. People of all ages, sizes, and abilities can practice it. There are no tournaments or competitions. Its purpose is to build sincere people through mental and physical discipline. Note: Aikido is a hands-on martial art and will be instructed and conducted authentically; therefore, bowing, physical contact, and training with the opposite gender are absolute requirements of this course. Additionally, this course is an elective course in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 8 & 9. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.



GCST 1220    Practical Applications of Traditional Aikido     Credits  2         Goal Areas  07,09     View Course Outline

This course uses Traditional Aikido (a Japanese martial art) in order to help the student gain skills both on and off the mat, applying them to his or her profession and daily life. The student will research, study, and practice real-life scenarios and situations of de-escalation, protection, compliance, and restraint- maximizing safety, focus, awareness, and control. Aikido is a life-giving tool. This class appeals to the beginner and experienced Aikido student. It is ideal for Criminal Justice, Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Military, and Security jobs as well as other service professions. *Note: This course is an elective course in Global and Cultural Studies fulfilling the MnTC Goal Areas 7 & 8. It will not count toward any HEALTH OR PE requirements.



GCST 1320    Community Organizing     Credits  3         Goal Areas  07,09     View Course Outline

The focus of this course will be developing leadership skills through community organizing and empowering students to make lasting changes at the college, in their own communities and the world. Students will examine past and present social movements with a special focus on organizing in communities of color. This course will also explore the contemporary meanings of community in the United States. Students will learn to identify the leader within by examining the relationship between community and citizenship. This course will also focus on issues of diversity and sustainable communities with the practical application of active leadership techniques and creative organizing on our campus. This could include aspects of the annual Earth Week Program such as Marketing, PR, Event Planning, Budgeting, Community Partnerships, Cross Campus and Cross cultural collaborations, and curriculum integration.



GCST 1990    Interdisciplinary Studies Topic     Credits  0         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course will provide flexibility in offering an in-depth review of topics of immediate importance and topical interest. These topics will go beyond the introductory courses in examining specific aspects of the subject matter.



GCST 2320    Community Organizing II     Credits  3         Goal Areas  08,10     View Course Outline

Building on the foundational local work of GCST 1320, this project and research based course will focus on further developing leadership skills and community connections at a local, national and global level to create student change agents. This course provides essential information for grassroots organizing and coalition building, and incorporates research on successful models locally and globally that have supported oppressed populations to create social and environmental change. Students will understand the importance of power theory and dynamics and then identify a local or global issue, creating strategies for collective action and developing and implementing these strategies into practice. Through analysis of media, culture, government policies, social movements, systemic racism and marginalization of groups, and participating in practical social change activities, students will learn to explore and synthesize multiple points of view and individual and collective responsibilities to create a more just, ethical and sustainable future. Activities could include research projects on campus, with City of Brooklyn Park, and other area, national and international organizations, data collection and analysis, research papers, presentations, creation of documentaries