NHCC | North Hennepin Community College

Course Descriptions

ENGL 0900    Preparation for College Writing I     Credits  3         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This composition course introduces the process and strategies of writing clear, focused paragraphs. Students learn and practice the basic skills of standard American written English, including grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. Prerequisite: College required assessment for placement



ENGL 0950    Preparation for College Writing II     Credits  4         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This composition course is for students who need a more intensive review of standard American written English (grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure)than English 1201 provides. The course also introduces the processes and strategies of essay writing from first thoughts through revision to the final, edited, 2-3 page essay. Prerequisite: College required assessment for placement



ENGL 0990    Gateway Composition     Credits  2         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This composition course is for students who need a more intensive review of standard American written English (grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure) than English 1201 alone provides. The course also introduces the processes and strategies of essay writing from first thoughts through revision to the final, edited college-level essay. Prerequisite: College required assessment for placement OR prior successful completion of English 0900



ENGL 1140    Professional Writing     Credits  3         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course offers students the opportunity to improve their writing skills and adapt them for professional communication. Students will focus on assessing purpose, audience, credibility, style, clarity/correctness, and format to determine appropriate approaches to a range of written and electronic communication, including memos, letters, employment documents, and proposals/reports.



ENGL 1150    Introduction to Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of literatures and to means to credibly examine that literature. It thus includes literary terms, critical approaches and their application to literature.



ENGL 1200    Gateway College Writing     Credits  6         Goal Areas  01     View Course Outline

This composition course is for students who need a more intensive review of standard American written English (grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure) than English 1201 alone provides. The course also introduces the processes and strategies of essay writing from first thoughts through revision to the final, edited college-level essay. Additionally, the class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included. Prerequisites: College required assessment for placement OR prior successful completion of English 0900



ENGL 1201    College Writing I     Credits  4         Goal Areas  01     View Course Outline

This class provides extended practice in critical reading, writing, and thinking skills. Students will develop an effective writing process and work to achieve college-level competence in reading and responding to texts, visuals, events, and ideas in a variety of written formats, with an emphasis on the academic essay. Audience awareness, interpretation and analysis, logical reasoning, and persuasive and argumentative skills will be developed. MLA style documentation of primary sources will be included. Placement by college assessment (includes both reading and writing levels); or a grade of C or higher in English 0950 Preparation for College Writing II; or a grade of C or higher in ESOL 1260 College Writing Skills Development plus an ESOL reading level at ESOL 1230 College Reading and Study Skills or above. College assessment test results are valid for 3 years. A satisfactory grade in ENGL 0950 is valid indefinitely. A satisfactory grade in ESOL 1260 is valid indefinitely.



ENGL 1202    College Writing II     Credits  2         Goal Areas  01     View Course Outline

This class focuses on the research process, textual analysis of primary and secondary sources, rhetorical strategies for argument and persuasion, and successful integration of sources into a longer academic paper utilizing MLA (or other, as appropriate) documentation format. The class may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary, or topical in content, as noted on the class registration site. Prerequisite: Engl 1200 or 1201 with a grade of C or higher



ENGL 1250    Magazine Workshop     Credits  2         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This workshop offers students the opportunity to gain practical editorial experience by working on the college literary/arts magazine. As members of the editorial staff, students will solicit, select, and edit stories, essays and poems for publication. May be repeated for credit.



ENGL 1260    Newspaper Writing     Credits  2         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

Students will meet at least one hour each week in a laboratory format to edit and publish the student newspaper. Working in collaboration with student contributors and considering local, national and global issues, students will decide what is appropriate and relevant content for the campus newspaper.



ENGL 1400    Reading Poetry     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This course is a study of poetry: the reading and analysis of poetic works from a variety of time periods and cultures. Important figures, poetic traditions and movements, formal techniques, and other methods of evoking mood and meaning will be explored through discussion and in both written and oral projects throughout the semester.



ENGL 1450    Reading Plays     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course is a survey of drama as literature; plays will be read as literary texts, not as the grounds for specific performances or performance practices. Through their engagements with the dramatic literature in this course, students will be introduced to a diversity of dramatic styles and themes. Attention will also be devoted to the social and cultural contexts in which the plays were written and in which they are read. Course materials may be organized either historically or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 1900    Introduction to Creative Writing     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This class is designed for students who want to try creative writing, perhaps for the first time, and learn more about the creative process. No previous creative writing experience is necessary. Coursework will include reading, writing, and discussion of both student and professional work in at least three of the following genres: fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction (or memoir), and drama. The focus of the class, students' creative work, will be presented and critiqued in a workshop environment.



ENGL 1940    Technical Writing     Credits  3         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course further develops writing skills as applied to technical subjects for a specialized or lay audience. Credit does not apply to the 40 MnTC credits required in the A.A. degree except in programs where students are permitted to substitute English 1940 for English 1112 or 1202. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 1950    Graphic Novels     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This course will introduce students to the diverse body of literature known as "graphic novels." While emphasis will be placed on works that are specifically considered graphic novels, it may also include the study of other comics-strips and books-that have significantly contributed to the development of the form. Students can expect to be exposed not only to a wide range of graphic novel types, such as autobiography, journalism, history, humor, dramatic fiction, manga, and superheroes, but also to a deeper understanding of the methods of telling stories that are unique to comics.



ENGL 1960    Writing Workshop     Credits  1         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course is designed for people interested in more intensive work with creative writing projects. The emphasis could range from poetry to story or nonfiction writing.



ENGL 1990    English Special Topics     Credits  1-4         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course will provide flexibility in offering an in-depth review of topics of immediate importance and topical interest. These topics will go beyond the introductory courses in examining specific aspects of the subject matter.



ENGL 2010    Writing Creative Non-Fiction and Memoir     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This course offers beginning instruction in the art of writing creative non-fiction, which includes the personal essay, literary journalism, and other hybrid forms, as well as memoir writing. Students will read and analyze the work of professional writers, explore a variety of techniques for discovering material and topics, and experience workshop peer review of their work. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2020    Writing Stories     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This course offers beginning instruction in the art of writing fiction. Exploring techniques for generating material, engaging in writing exercises, and critically examining contemporary short fiction are important aspects of this course. Students will develop a portfolio of their writing and will critique others' work in a writing workshop environment. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2030    Writing Poetry     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

Beginning instruction in the art of poetry. Exploring techniques for generating material, engaging in writing exercises both in and out of class, and discussing examples of contemporary poetry are important aspects of this class. Students will draft a collection of poems and critique others' work in a writing workshop environment.



ENGL 2270    Modern American Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

This course will introduce students to selected American writers of the twentieth and/or twenty-first centuries and their works. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically. Prerequisite: Engl 1201 or Engl 1111



ENGL 2300    Children's Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

In this course, students will have the pleasure of reading, discussing and evaluating childrens literature ranging from the picture book to the young adult novel. Students will explore the history of childrens literature, critical responses to it and its specific role for children and adults. Students will examine works from the genre that might include picture books, chapter books, folktales, fantasy, realistic fiction, historical fiction, poetry and nonfiction with an emphasis on how the genre and its themes have evolved over time, paying particular attention to how those themes address the role of children in society. This course will appeal to students, parents and educators. Prerequisite: Assessment score placement in Adev 950 or above, ENGL 950 or above, or ESOL 1230 or above. Recommendation: Completion of ENGL 1201 with a grade of "C" or higher.



ENGL 2310    American Short Story     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

The short story is a form that was created and refined by American writers of the 19th and 20th centuries. Students will study American short story writers, their stories, and their views of American life.



ENGL 2320    Writing: From Structure to Style     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course focuses on the structure of language as well how its rules and applications affect written communication and authorial choices in professional and academic settings. The course further intends to create confidence in written and oral expression, to support students in business, graphic arts, paralegal, and other programs. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2330    Hmong American Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

Hmong American Literature explores the works of Hmong writers as represented in the novel, nonfiction, short stories, poetry, drama/film, and Paj Ntaub (stories recorded in tapestry). To a more limited extent, characterizations of Hmong in works by non-Hmong authors may be considered, as well as relevant works by Laotian American and Asian American writers.



ENGL 2340    Nature in Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,10     View Course Outline

This course surveys literature that examines the relation between human beings and the natural world as that relationship has been variously conceived by British, American, and other writers. The literary works studied may begin with the pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance and focus on literature from the late eighteenth-century, nineteenth century, and contemporary works. The primary consideration of this course is on how a literary idea of nature has been affected and effected by variations in culture, namely, changes in politics, economics, and technology that in diverse cultural and historical contexts have created conflicts between ecological and human interests. Ultimately this study leads to considering how the "green language" created by the writers under study has contributed to an eco-critical ethic that allows examination of current ecological sensibilities and the language that represents them. The course may also engage oriental literature, for many American and British authors have aligned their thinking on nature with eastern religions. Additionally, the content will reference painters, philosophers, and composers whose works contribute a relevant understanding of nature-as they may lead into relevant scientific considerations of nature. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2350    Women and Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course explores women as characters in and writers of literature, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry. The course may also address issues of historical context, gender, class and race as a way of understanding women in literature.



ENGL 2360    Global Literary Perspectives     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,08     View Course Outline

Students will interpret world literature and film (either in translation or originally written in English) that present culturally diverse voices and viewpoints. Special attention will be given to colonial and postcolonial literatures that reflect the immigrant communities of Twin Cities college campuses, such as Egyptian, Finnish, Ethiopian, Hmong, Icelandic, Iranian, Korean, Liberian, Mexican, Norwegian, Russian, Somali, Swedish, and Vietnamese. Prerequisite: Placement into Engl 1201



ENGL 2370    African American Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course introduces the student to the writings of African-Americans from the colonial period to the present and explores the contributions of these writers to American culture, letters, and life. The course may be organized either by historic periods or topically.



ENGL 2380    American Indian Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course introduces the students to North American Native American Literature. Readings may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, songs, mythology, and film from traditional and contemporary authors. Special attention may be given to Native American authors with Minnesota connections, such as Louise Erdrich, David Treuer, and Susan Power.



ENGL 2390    American Working-Class Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,09     View Course Outline

This course, providing much needed exposure to a largely overlooked body of writings, introduces students to a variety of classical and contemporary working-class texts that demonstrate literatures rich engagement with industrial, agricultural, domestic, and/or other labor in the United States. Encompassing writings by and about laborers and persons associated with labor, working-class literature reveals the often hidden ways that the material conditions and cultural expectations tied to class and work influence the shape of daily life and its literary expressions. Featuring textual, visual, and/or audio cultural productions, the course is designed to examine the problems and questions raised by working-class texts, which may include the changing nature of work, the dynamic experience of class, the historical circumstances that structure class, the intersection of literature and labor movements, the unstable definitions of literature, and the political dimensions of literature. The course may be organized historically or topically.



ENGL 2450    Survey of American Literature I     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary developments (e.g. sentimentalism, gothic fiction, romanticism, transcendentalism) and key historical and social contexts, from the pre-colonial period to 1860. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2460    Survey of American Literature II     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course will provide students with a chronological overview of American literature, including major writers, literary movements (e.g. local color, realism, naturalism, modernism, and post-modernism) and social and historical contexts, from 1860 to the present. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2500    Playwrighting     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06     View Course Outline

Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of writing theatrical plays. They will be expected to work on several creative projects throughout the semester and to participate in workshops in which they will discuss and critique one another's work. Students may also be asked to complete other writing exercises and to analyze a selection of plays to gain a better understanding of the art of playwrighting. Prerequisite: Engl 1900



ENGL 2550    Survey of British Literature I     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,08     View Course Outline

This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from its beginnings to 1785. Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Donne, and Swift, among others, are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended.



ENGL 2560    Survey of British Literature II     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,08     View Course Outline

This course covers the literature of Great Britain with its historical background from 1785 through the 20th century. The literature of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods are studied in this course. Prerequisite: Engl 1201 with coursework in literature strongly recommended



ENGL 2580    The Shakespeare's Plays     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,08     View Course Outline

A study of the major plays of William Shakespeare that may include a close reading of the plays, consideration of acting methods, and evaluation of cinematic and theatrical presentations. Prerequisite: Engl 1201



ENGL 2900    Fantasy Literature     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,07     View Course Outline

This course will introduce students to fantasy as a literary genre. It will expose students to various types of fantasy stories (such as high fantasy, sword and sorcery, urban fantasy, and/or fantasy horror). It will also address how fantasy literature can reflect or comment on issues in the real world, including how various forms of bigotry can be challenged or normalized by fantasy texts.



ENGL 2950    Mystery and Detective Fiction     Credits  3         Goal Areas  06,09     View Course Outline

This course will introduce students to mystery and detective fiction as a literary genre and as popular literature, examining the conventions of suspense writing, possibly including hook, twist, red herring, back story, sub-plot, procedural, clues, and the ethical concerns of investigative methods and civic life. Discussion of various sub-genre styles will engage students in critical thinking applied to historical era, culturally diverse contexts, and gender roles in mystery writing.



ENGL 2960    Creative Writing Capstone Project     Credits  1         Goal Areas  n/a     View Course Outline

This course is intended for students who are in the Creative Writing AFA program and within a semester of completion. This capstone experience will focus on the writing and revision of a demonstrative portfolio of writing within a single genre, multiple genres, or blended genres (poetry, fiction, scriptwriting, and/or creative nonfiction). Students will work individually with faculty to develop and polish their writing for publication submission and movement toward further study and/or career options.